Boston, MA — In many dystopian novels, from Brave New World to 1984, training the children to unconditionally love and support the state is an underlying theme and a necessity for maintaining the status quo.

In 1984, the state was still attempting to condition the population to be unquestioningly obedient. Through language designed to make tattling noble, the children would turn in their own parents for thought crimes or other violations.

In Brave New World, however, the conditioning process was perfected, and the state only needed to maintain its control.

In both instances, the idea of parental or familial loyalty was nonexistent. A child who believes the state is their mommy and daddy — needs no parents.

In the United States, children, on average, will spend over 1,000 hours every year for 13 straight years, in government indoctrination facilities known as public schools. While in these schools, students are taught a distorted and exceptional version of American history in which all acts carried out by the government have been honorable and in humankind’s best interest. As the Free Thought Project has pointed out in the past, this is dangerous — and, it couldn’t be further from the truth.

Children are taught not to question the status quo; anyone who does so is labeled as a troublemaker. After 9/11, state-sponsored advertising campaigns began to encourage citizens to “say something” if they “see something.”

In fictional dystopias and in non-fictional dystopias like Nazi Germany, the state relies on its subservient and obedient informant citizens to police their own. This distrust among neighbors promotes group think and makes those who may have rebellious tendencies stand out.

This years-long campaign of encouraging citizens to rat on each other has created a paranoid society of drones who will turn in their own neighbors who ‘look suspicious’ to do their civic duty.

The “see something, say something” conditioning comes in multiple forms — from signs, to commercials, to repetitive recordings played ad nauseam inside train stations and airports. Chris Hedges sums up this society quite well:

What is especially disturbing about this constant call to become a citizen informant is that it directs our eyes away from what we should see—the death of our democracy, the growing presence and omnipotence of the police state, and the evisceration, in the name of our security, of our most basic civil liberties.

Nothing highlights the effects of such a paranoid police state quite like a recent story out of Boston, Mass. in which a 6-year-old child ratted out his own father for running a red light.

After watching his dad turn right on red, Robbie Richardson began to chastise his father for breaking the law. When the pair finally returned home, the little boy called 9-1-1 and reported his father to the police.

The 9-1-1 recording was recently released, and on it, Robbie told Massachusetts police: “My daddy went past a red light, he has a black truck, and he was in the brand new car, my mommy’s car.”

He went on to tell the dispatcher that his father “had to go to the car wash and then he went past the red light.”

Robbie spoke to Inside Edition Thursday, saying: “I told the police guy to give my daddy a ticket.”

Luckily, for his father, police weren’t dispatched out to his house to issue a citation or arrest him. However, the sheer ominous nature of a boy calling the police on his own father is chilling. Not to mention that, after this story broke, the boy went on record noting that he still disagrees with his father and still thinks he should be ticketed.

It should come as no surprise that little Robbie Richardson wants to be a police officer when he grows up. However, as we’ve pointed out numerous times in the past — even cops won’t rat on their own family members.

Sadly, every news outlet that reported on this story failed to address the implications of children turning in their parents, and the story was presented in a humorous light. It is no laughing matter.

A similar but much more grave scenario presented itself in 2014 in Barnesville, Minn. when a 9-year-old girl walked into a police station and turned her parents in for growing marijuana.

The local police praised the pint-sized snitch, who likely learned that the incredibly beneficial cannabis plant ‘was the devil’ during the 1,000 plus hours a year she spent in public school.

“She was a very brave, very smart, very articulate little girl,” officer Ryan Beattie said. “It was almost like interviewing an adult. She appeared to have intelligence far above a normal little girl … [and] she gave some pretty specific information about things, like types of drug paraphernalia, that no young person ought to have knowledge about.”

Freedom is but one generation away from extinction. Through incrementalism and societal norms designed to make slavery appealing, the very idea of liberty becomes diluted to the point of meaninglessness. Freedom is not something that is perpetual — it must be practiced and protected — and, to preserve it, our children must do the same.

Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Facebook.