Home / #Solutions / BREAKING: Victory! Amidst Massive Protests, Army Corps Blocks Dakota Pipeline

BREAKING: Victory! Amidst Massive Protests, Army Corps Blocks Dakota Pipeline

pipe-line-victory

In a complete reversal of the expected, early reports say the Army Corps of Engineers has now denied the easement which would allow Energy Transfer Partners to drill and route the Dakota Access Pipeline under the Missouri River.

A press release from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe says “the Department of the Army will not approve an easement that will allow the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe.”

That statement reads:

“Today, the Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not be granting the easement to cross Lake Oahe for the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline. Instead, the Corps will be undertaking an environmental impact statement to look at possible alternate routes. We wholeheartedly support the decision of the administration and commend with the utmost gratitude the courage it took on the part of President Obama, the Army Corps, the Department of Justice and the Department of the Interior to take steps to correct the course of history and to do the right thing.

“The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and all of Indian Country will be forever grateful to the Obama Administration for this historic decision.”

This announcement comes as thousands of U.S. military veterans continue to descend on Standing Rock to defend Indigenous water protectors from further police violence.

Those veterans join thousands of others encamped on the banks of the Missouri near the Lake Oahe reservoir, where Energy Transfer Partners — the company responsible for construction, and in the midst of a merger with Sunoco Logistics — has continued operations at a drill pad despite stern warnings from the Army Corps against those actions.

While initial reports were unclear, the statement from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe validates the information, first emerging from a Facebook video from Native American Council Elder Remi Baldeagle, in which he stated, smiling broadly:

“Up until this point the American government has failed us, but the American people haven’t. So, I feel American today.”

Baldeagle explained the Secretary of the Army gave the decision to Standing Rock Sioux Chairman Dave Archambault II earlier today.

According to the U.S. Army in a statement to its website:

“The Department of the Army will not approve an easement that would allow the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline to cross under Lake Oahe in North Dakota, the Army’s Assistant Secretary for Civil Works announced today,” the Army’s Assistant Secretary for Civil Works, Jo-Ellen Darcy, stated.

“Although we have had continuing discussion and exchanges of new information with the Standing Rock Sioux and Dakota Access, it’s clear that there’s more work to do.The best way to complete that work responsibly and expeditiously is to explore alternate routes for the pipeline crossing.”

Although undoubtedly this news is welcome to the thousands of water protectors camped in the bitter North Dakota winter in support of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe — and hundreds of thousands worldwide who have worked toward action against the Dakota Access Pipeline — a re-routing is not the ultimate solution most had hoped for.

In fact, on the ground near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, a somewhat subdued mood reigned, as many suspected the Army Corps might simply be acting to defuse an increasingly tense, violent, and controversial situation.

Whether or not the refusal to grant the necessary easement will result in effective changes satisfactory to the Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribes and their supporters will have to be seen in coming days.

In the meantime, however, Energy Transfer Partners is obligated to halt Dakota Access Pipeline construction immediately — and the route under the Lake Oahe reservoir will be permanently abandoned.

  • Connie Rogers

    THANK GOD & ALL THE AMERICAN PEOPLE WHO MADE THEIR STAND TOGETHER!!!!!

    • Hardlee_Ded

      It will be a short lived feeling of victory…

    • John Cokos

      The next stage for us as Veterans is to organize for the next stage of this battle and be ready to let Trump know that we are here for the long haul. A Veterans march on Washington DC for the Inauguration similar to what the Veterans For Trump plan is a good model. We all can agree to disagree, with boots on the ground….

  • Hohum2

    Good news, and this
    Native American Council Elder Remi Baldeagle, in which he stated, smiling broadly:
    “Up until this point the American government has failed us, but the American people haven’t. So, I feel American today.”

    is very heartening.

    • Hardlee_Ded

      The pipeline is nearly complete… this delay means nothing and it
      won’t do much more than delay construction a couple months… I think
      anyone seeing this as a victory is sadly mistaken.

      With only about 1,100 feet of the pipeline left to complete it will be… and legally
      there is nothing beyond asking for an environmental impact study before
      granting the easement that is even going to slow the project down.

      As the pipeline doesn’t cross an international border they don’t need
      federal approval and any denial of the permit will be overturned by the
      courts.

      Facts:

      ” Dakota Access took a reckless gamble with
      its investor’s money when it built its pipeline to either side of the
      river without the easement…”

      “…Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network noted that the Obama Administration’s announcement that the US Army Corps will not grant DAPL the easement to drill under the Missouri River “is not a straight DENIAL, but rather a
      MAJOR suspension on a decision pending a limited EIS.”

      “The US Army Corps will conduct a limited Environmental Impact Statement on the
      river crossing and explore possibilities for alternative routes,” said Goldtooth.

      This delay will last until about January 20th…. and
      then all fines will be waved, permits granted and about the same time
      the border crossing for the Keystone XL will be approved so it can be
      completed as well..

      Welcome to Trumps America.

      • John Cokos

        Hardlee_Ded: You sound like a True Believer. They are in Violation of an Administrative Agency directive. Energy Transfer may try an end run around this thru the Courts, but in the end they will fail. Even in a Trump Administration, it would be an uphill battle as all three branches of government will need to be lined up to overturn this. Trump faces MASSIVE opposition on this matter down the road, and we will better prepared coming off this win. It’s going to be a LONG WINTER, and I don’t think Trump has the stones to be tied up in something that is NOT going away.
        You still don’t get Trump. He’s a Narcissist, he has a underlying need to liked and thought of as a hero in everyone’s eye’s. He will politically shape shift to accommodate whatever way the wind blows on this. He has shed off most of the core supporter’s that he had in the beginning, and will do whatever is necessary to maintain his image.
        President’s come and go, Agencies are in the mix for the long haul….

        • sarah

          Having known many Trump supporters from the time he was just 1 of 17 trying to win the GOP noiation I can say I do not know a single core supporter who does not still support Trump.

          Either you are a liar or you are smoking the Liberal dope.

          Maybe both.

          • John Cokos

            Sarah: You are a shallow thinker, your response doesn’t contain anything other than just a personal statement. Elaborate on your thoughts and make the blog interesting.
            You are stating opinions, not facts…the ball is in your corner

      • scott

        You keep ending your comments with “Welcome to Trumps America” as if Trump has any say in any of whats happened. Until Jan 20th, all that’s happened has happened prior to Trump.

        You can’t say “Welcome to Trumps America” It’s not his yet, and we’ve been this way awhile. Let’s please not try to blame the new president for the last presidents approvals before the new one is even in office. 😉 The man hasn’t even been officially elected yet and you want to blame him for it lol.

  • JdL

    I just hope the celebration is not too soon.

    • skyp0ckets

      I know. I feel it is a temporary stay.

      • Hardlee_Ded

        That’s because it is… until about January 20th’.

  • davidhollenshead

    The Conflict was totally unnecessary in the first place.
    The Pipeline never needed to cross controversial lands, and could be built with adequate spill protection.
    The catch is it would have cost a little bit more, and thus would have reduced their profit margin a bit.
    Hopefully this protest will lead to the cooperation between First Peoples Nations getting their Sovereignty back, with full nation within a nation status.

    • Hardlee_Ded

      The pipeline is nearly complete… this delay means nothing and it
      won’t do much more than delay construction a couple months… I think
      anyone seeing this as a victory is sadly mistaken.

      With only about 1,100 feet of the pipeline left to complete it will be… and legally
      there is nothing beyond asking for an environmental impact study before
      granting the easement that is even going to slow the project down.

      As the pipeline doesn’t cross an international border they don’t need
      federal approval and any denial of the permit will be overturned by the
      courts.

      Facts:

      ” Dakota Access took a reckless gamble with
      its investor’s money when it built its pipeline to either side of the
      river without the easement…”

      “…Dallas
      Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network noted that the Obama
      Administration’s announcement that the US Army Corps will not grant DAPL
      the easement to drill under the Missouri River “is not a straight
      DENIAL, but rather a
      MAJOR suspension on a decision pending a limited EIS.”

      “The US Army Corps will conduct a limited Environmental Impact Statement on the
      river crossing and explore possibilities for alternative routes,” said Goldtooth.

      This
      delay will last until about January 20th…. and then all fines will be
      waved, permits granted and about the same time the border crossing for
      the Keystone XL will be approved so it can be completed as well..

      Welcome to Trumps America.

      • davidhollenshead

        If they:
        ran concrete sewer pipe under the river,
        placed the pipeline inside it,
        with emergency pumps to a storage pond,
        and with remote monitoring,
        the pipeline can’t contaminate the river.

        The catch is that they don’t want to pay for this level of safety, which is one of the really disturbing parts.
        The other disturbing part is digging in stolen land, with a historical graves.

  • Shiny Indigo

    As awful as the bitter cold weather conditions are, they
    should still stay camped out there until the January contract deadline
    for the pipeline to be functional has passed. I wouldn’t trust the
    government to be on the level with this – they don’t have the best track
    record when it comes to keeping agreements with Indigenous People.

    • Phil Freeman

      Correct, they have not been honourable to date with us. I don’t expect they will now. We must stand our ground.

      • Hardlee_Ded

        Good look with that… after the permits are set they’ll just start hauling the protestors out… this protest was doomed to failure from the start because the pipeline was nearly complete before the protestors even showed up.

        • Phil Freeman

          The protectors have been on that land for a millennia. No oil will ever flow in this pipe.

          • The Sioux have only been on that land since 1776. They stole it from the Arikara.

          • Phil Freeman

            Native lands are from horizon to horizon.

          • Elliotte Little Bear

            i believe most of the Arikara died out from smallpox another foreign disease its the treaty of 1851 and 1868 boundaries that count now,but what matters is the lakota people stood up with their allies from all over the world and fought for what they believe in the purity of the land water resources for future generations to come even as i type there is a report of an oil spill in western north dakota someones land is ruined, oh but he got paid for it, i forgot thats how you overlook the truth pay em off my friend ranches down texas way oilfields galore he quit,now works to preserve the land the land can not be used for twenty years he told me if it gets a spill on it,and if things do get bloody it’ll be white blood that is spilled too you guys are acting like this is gonna kill you it will in the end though i guess greed, hate, just because the lakota’s stood up for their selves and their resources, you need to get real all any of us own are the skin covering our bones our spirit belongs to the lord me personally if it goes through it goes if it dont then hoka hey but when you start threatening to beat kill lakota’s then it becomes a different matter,two can play at that game though,so who is illegal now that the corps has stopped DAPL for now,who threatened on CNN to keep drilling to hell with the corps of engineers WHO?

          • Phil Freeman

            You’re incorrect. I know it, you know it. We know it.

          • Actually, no. You don’t know anything. The “Sioux,” Lakota, Dakota, Nakota, are not “native” to North or South Dakota at all. When the treaty of 1851 was first drafted, they’d only been there roughly 75 years, a couple of generations. We (the US) simply took the validity of their claim to the land for granted, simply because they were there and had kicked arse all over the other natives in the region.

            The actual “ancient” or “traditional” homeland of the “Sioux” is Minnesota pretty much, where they began to be driven west in the early-mid 1700’s by the Anishinabe or Chippewa/Ojibwe–all bad French permutations (like Sioux) given them by the voyageurs, the first “white” men regularly to contact them. The Anishinabe called their local rivals “little snakes” (Nadouessioux,) but this has in modern times been explained away by claiming the sign language symbol for snake and a river are essentially the same, and modern Anishinabe are pretending in many cases now to have never refered to the “Sioux” as snakes, just meant to say they lived by the river. Of course, that doesn’t explain away their generations of bloody warfare, or the fact that the name came from spoken language, not sign language. But for a couple hundred years they had no problem with allowing the obvious origins of “Sioux” to be perpetuated, and this because, of course, they did in fact for generations derisively call them “little snakes,” hated and warred with them, stole their stuff, and drove them out of their homeland almost entirely from the mid-1700’s onward.

            “Sioux Origin-

            North American French, from Nadouessioux, from Ojibwa (Ottawa dialect) nātowēssiwak, by substitution of the French plural ending -x for the Ojibwa plural -ak .”

            Now, let alone that the “Sioux” are thought to have migrated to modern Minnesota from much farther east, the east coast or Appalachians, at one time Creek, Cherokee and other native homelands. That being said, their best case for “home” territory is in fact Minnesota, not anywhere near Standing Rock, North, or South Dakota. The Arikara on the other hand, first entered North Dakota and environs around 1500, followed by the Mandan and Hidatsa, smaller tribes. The Hidatsa have a very interesting history but no time here to go into it. The Arikara were originally the main tribe of the region, but soon fell under depredations from the Cheyenne, then the Lakota and Dakota. (The Arikara are the Indians of the “Revenant” movie with Leo DeCaprio–the bear dancers.)

            Originally the Hidatsa were sworn enemies of the Arikara. The Mandan seemed to opt out of a lot of warfare, but got raided by the Arikara anyway, and then as I say, as the Cheyenne moved in, the Arikara became the least of their problems. When the “Sioux” moved in, they entered with dogs, and soon acquired horses from the Cheyenne according to most stories. One story claims a Lakota warrior was taken prisoner by the Cheyenne, but rather than torture him to death as usual, he’d fought so bravely, as a sign of respect, they put him on a horse and sent him back to home camp with a string of ponies and other gifts. (Until the Cheyenne, none of these north-plains natives apparently had horses, just dogs as pack animals.) It’s more likely that the Lakota/Dakota stole their horses, which was a main Native American hobby back in the day.

            http://www.encyclopedia.com/history/united-states-and-canada/north-american-indigenous-peoples/hidatsa

            http://www.cliomuse.com/the-indians-of-the-revenant.html

            By 1823 we find the Arikara still one of the foremost band of native cutthroats in the eyes of the encroaching “white” man, still occupying more or less, the Standing Rock area, though smallpox epidemics in the late 1700’s and massacres inficted upon their weakened numbers by the Lakota and Dakota in particular found them retreating to the north.

            http://hughglass.org/arikara-battle-2/

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arikara_War

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arikara

            To sum it up the “Standing Rock Sioux” as a modern, united tribe were only invented in 1959 when their “nation” was chartered. Until then, they were roving bands of Lakota/Dakota without fixed land claims. That’s a “white” concept anyway. Also, the Arikara were not wiped out by smallpox, nor were the Mandan, as often retold today. The “Sioux” took advantage of the smallpox epidemic, and their weakened state (from around 25-30,000 at peak, to 6,000 or so at the ebb of the Arikara strength, lower numbers for the Mandan) to take all their land. The Lakota in particular also waged a war of conquest over the Hidatsa, as I alluded, Mandan, as well as the Kiowa, Pawnee, Crow and many others, including their ultimate defeat of the Cheyenne.

            Eventually, the Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara joined forces against their common enemy, the “Sioux.” Today they live where they were driven by the Lakota in particular, in the Fort Berthold Reservation, sitting right on the sweet bubble of the Bakken oil reserves, owning their own wells, production company, refinery (almost there) and producing 11% of the reserves entire output. (Joke’s on you “Sioux.”)

            http://mhanation.com/
            http://www.npr.org/2016/11/24/503212965/upstream-from-standing-rock-tribes-balance-benefits-risks-of-oil-industry

            When the treaty of 1851 was drafted, it was in large part an attempt to quell the constant Lakota warfare and equitably divide up native territories–but the “Standing Rock Sioux” as we now call them, and their “Sioux” relatives, refused to honor those treaties–treaties not just with the US, but with their fellow conquered natives, natives who had in fact petitioned the United States to provide them with weapons and soldiers to put down the “Sioux,” and force them to accept a universal treaty of territorial settlement amongst the warring tribes and bands. As it was, the “Sioux” were maintaining land claims stolen as little as a few years previously, but the other “natives” in the negotiation were bargaining as the losers, beaten, weakened, and no longer the kings of the mountain, or should I say, badasses of the high plains. That was now the Lakota, and similarly, the Dakota.

            So in reality, it was the Standing Rock “Sioux” who forced the hasty, duress-forced treaty of 1851, to essentially dissolve by violating its terms. In fact, even after the later treaty of 1869, which attempted to yes, steal gold from the Black Hills, but also pacify the MHA, the “three fires” who got screwed up north by the Sioux, the ever-ambitious “Sioux” waged a war of extermination against the Pawnee on their southern borders, in Nebraska, capped off by a spectacular massacre of a Pawnee hunting party in 1873, which again, suggested that the treaty of 1869 hadn’t held the Sioux in check at all. It’s hypocritical to say the least, some 150 years give or take later, that the the borders both north and south you refused to accept in 1851 relative to your fellow natives, are now inviolate relative to the “white man.” If your contention is you stole your land fair and square by “right of conquest,” the counter argument is that the “white man” has done no more or less than you did to get it in the first place when he takes it from you.

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DiQ7X9jgXog

            http://www.americancowboychronicles.com/2013/12/the-pawnee-massacre-sundown-of-pawnee.html

            There really isn’t a more definitive example of a war of conquest than the 1873 action of the Lakota against the Pawnee.

            Oh yeah? That’s not true? I know it? You know it?

            You don’t know anything. From wiki:

            “The Arikara faced many challenges during the first quarter of the 19th century: Reduced numbers, competition from white traders, and military pressure from the Lakota and other groups of Sioux. Alliances shifted constantly. The Arikara joined old foes the Sioux in raids on Mandan and Hidatsa Indians. Later they negotiated for peace with both village tribes.[17]

            Due to their reduced numbers, the Arikara started to live closer to the Mandan and Hidatsa tribes in the same area for mutual protection. They migrated gradually from present-day Nebraska and South Dakota into North Dakota in response to pressure from other tribes, especially the Sioux, and European-American settlers. The remainder of the group was encountered in 1804 by the Lewis and Clark Expedition.[4]

            The first Arikara delegation left for the capital, Washington, DC, in April 1805, urged by the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Chief Ankedoucharo became ill during his stay and died in Washington.[18] The delegates blamed the whites for the chief’s death. That was one reason why the Arikara for the next decades were “notoriously hostile to white Americans”.[19]

            In 1823, the Arikara killed more than ten fur traders visiting a village at the mouth of Grand River (now in South Dakota). Colonel Henry Leavenworth left Fort Atkinson (now in Nebraska) with 220 men. More than 700 Yankton, Yanktonai and Lakota Indians joined him in the United States’ first Indian war west of the Missouri. The Arikara retreated to their fortified village. Soon the disappointed Sioux left the battlefield. The Arikara escaped at night, and angry fur traders set their empty lodges ablaze the next morning.[20] “This was the only time in history that any of the Three Tribes fought in open warfare against the Unites States”.[21]

            The Bloody Hand and other Arikara chiefs signed a peace treaty with the United States (US) on July 18, 1825.[22] They may not have realized that under US terms, they at the same time recognized the supremacy of the United States.

            Years of indecision followed. The rootless Arikara lived near their southern “kinfolk,” the Skidi Pawnee, for some years. They also tried their luck in hostile country far up on the Platte (now Nebraska), where Colonel Henry Dodge met them in 1835.[23] Harassed by the numerous Sioux, the Arikara finally buried old enmity and befriended the Mandan and the Hidatsa in the late 1830s. The manager in the trading post Fort Clark observed in June 1838, how “the Rees, Mandans and Gros Ventres [Hidatsas] started out early” in a common bison hunt.[24]

            Smallpox had struck the Upper Missouri tribes the year before (and would again in 1856). It decimated the Mandan. The surviving Arikara took over the almost empty Mandan village Mitutanka next to Fort Clark.[25] The earth lodges stood until Yankton Sioux set them on fire in January 1839.[26] The village was rebuilt by the Arikara, who lived there until 1861. Another Sioux attack – and the need for a trading post – made them leave the settlement for good.[27]

            The goal of the United States in the Laramie Treaty of 1851 was to establish a permanent peace on most of the northern plains and to define tribal territories. The basic treaty area of the Arikara, the Hidatsa and the Mandan was a mutual territory north of Heart River, encircled on the east and north by the Missouri and on the west by Yellowstone River down to the mouth of Powder River. The Lakota had continued to press north after 1823, so they got treaty rights on the area along Grand River as well as other land south of Heart River.[28]

            Peace was short-lived. As drawings by W. J. Hoffman of Hunkpapa Chief Running Antelope showed, in 1853 he already had killed four Arikara Indians.[29] The next year the Three Tribes called for the U. S. Army to intervene; that request had influence for the next two decades.[30]

            Arikara hunters were waylaid and had difficulties securing enough game and hides. A lengthy battle between an Arikara camp on hunt and several hundred Lakota took place in June 1858. The Arikara camp lost ten men, with 34 wounded.[31]

            The Arikara built Star Village in the spring of 1862. They had to abandon it after a fierce fight with the Sioux a few months later. The Arikara crossed the Missouri and built new earth lodges and log houses near the common Mandan and Hidatsa village Like a Fishhook Village.[32] The village was built outside the Three Tribes treaty area. “We, the Arikara, have been driven from our country on the other side of the Missouri River by the Sioux”, declared chief White Shield in 1864.[33] As far as the records show, the Lakota did not offer any economic compensation for the land and hunting grounds they took from the Arikara.

            Like a Fishhook Village was not safe for devastation, strikes and raids for horses (and neither was the nearby trading post Fort Berthold II). Just before the end of 1862, some Sioux burned a part of the village.[34] The affiliation of the Sioux is not always clear: Lakota, Yanktonai and “refugee” Santee Sioux from the Minnesota uprising sometimes attacked the Three Tribes.[35] As always in intertribal warfare, there were interludes with peace – and conflicts with other Indian foes, as for example the Assiniboine.[36]

            In 1869, the Three Tribes asked the United States for guns as protection against hostile Sioux, and they finally received 300 pieces.[37]

            The Three Tribes sold a part of their southern treaty land, more or less already annexed by the Lakota, to the United States on April 12, 1870. At the same time, they got treaty on the area where Like a Fishhook Village was located.[38]”

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arikara

        • Phil Freeman

          Luck has nothing to do with it.

    • John Cokos

      Trust, BUT VERIFY !!! DAPL up to now has been completely lawless.

      • Hardlee_Ded

        No… they followed the law and got permits and leases… it is actually the federal government that is acting to prevent the permit until Obama is out of office… and with Trump coming in expect things to get bloody.

        Even if Clinton had won the courts would have cleared the permits on appeal…. this protest was lost before it began.

    • Hardlee_Ded

      The contract deadline only means they will be paying out money they can sue the government for after Trump is sworn in… with only a little over 1,100 feet to install still and all of it being for this easement… nothing will stop the completion.

      Not only that… shortly after January 20th the permits to complete the Keystone XL will be issued….

      Welcome to Trump’s America….

  • Kyrie

    “Today, the Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not be granting the easement to cross Lake Oahe for the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline. Instead, the Corps will be undertaking an environmental impact statement to look at possible alternate routes.”

    The Tribal Historic Preservation Office requested an environmental impact statement in February 2015. The Army Corps must be as slow as a glacier just like the rest of the leviathan.

  • Dirk

    Not granting it is temporary. They’ll “properly” research it, and when everyone’s gone, they’ll “approve” it, and before you know it, slipped right under the water. It’s a diversion.

    • Phil Freeman

      We will not allow it insofar as we are able to stop them lawfully.

      • skyp0ckets

        We must all hold fast, but the Republicans would like to make protesters/Protectors economic terrorists so we must be ready.

        • Phil Freeman

          Yes, it’s not over. They always return. We must remain vigilant.

        • Hardlee_Ded

          Good luck with that…

      • Hardlee_Ded

        The pipeline is nearly complete… this delay means nothing and it
        won’t do much more than delay construction a couple months… I think
        anyone seeing this as a victory is sadly mistaken.

        With only about 1,100 feet of the pipeline left to complete it will be… and legally
        there is nothing beyond asking for an environmental impact study before
        granting the easement that is even going to slow the project down.

        As the pipeline doesn’t cross an international border they don’t need
        federal approval and any denial of the permit will be overturned by the
        courts.

        Facts:

        ” Dakota Access took a reckless gamble with
        its investor’s money when it built its pipeline to either side of the
        river without the easement…”

        “…Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network noted that the Obama Administration’s announcement that the US Army Corps will not grant DAPL the easement to drill under the Missouri River “is not a straight DENIAL, but rather a
        MAJOR suspension on a decision pending a limited EIS.”

        “The US Army Corps will conduct a limited Environmental Impact Statement on the
        river crossing and explore possibilities for alternative routes,” said Goldtooth.

        This delay will last until about January 20th…. and then all fines will be waved, permits granted and about the same time the border crossing for the Keystone XL will be approved so it can be completed as well..

        Welcome to Trumps America.

        • Phil Freeman

          Doesn’t matter, the terrible PR the police and Dakota Access has generated will prevent any pipe going through native lands. We aren’t going to allow it.

        • John Cokos

          That should prove to be the LONGEST 1000 feet that DAPL will face !!!!

      • John Cokos

        We aren’t going anywhere…..

        • Phil Freeman

          Nope, a long haul event.

  • Elle

    Veterans start arriving with weapons to protect the protestors. BAM. Army Corp of engineers issues the statement it should’ve to begin with. Too bad it took this much and this long.

  • Kristi Noland

    Fantastic! but we all know Obama had jack Sh*t to do with this!

    • Allan Van Rye

      Less than jack sh*t.

    • Hardlee_Ded

      The pipeline is nearly complete… this delay means nothing and it
      won’t do much more than delay construction a couple months… I think
      anyone seeing this as a victory is sadly mistaken.

      With only about 1,100 feet of the pipeline left to complete it will be… and legally
      there is nothing beyond asking for an environmental impact study before
      granting the easement that is even going to slow the project down.

      As the pipeline doesn’t cross an international border they don’t need
      federal approval and any denial of the permit will be overturned by the
      courts.

      Facts:

      ” Dakota Access took a reckless gamble with
      its investor’s money when it built its pipeline to either side of the
      river without the easement…”

      Reality: Obama has no say… it’s not an international border.

      “…Dallas
      Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network noted that the Obama
      Administration’s announcement that the US Army Corps will not grant DAPL
      the easement to drill under the Missouri River “is not a straight
      DENIAL, but rather a
      MAJOR suspension on a decision pending a limited EIS.”

      “The US Army Corps will conduct a limited Environmental Impact Statement on the
      river crossing and explore possibilities for alternative routes,” said Goldtooth.

      This
      delay will last until about January 20th…. and then all fines will be
      waved, permits granted and about the same time the border crossing for
      the Keystone XL will be approved so it can be completed as well..

      Welcome to Trumps America.

  • morris

    Finally obuma has become the president, Hoorah, is it really better late than never..

  • Paschn

    Knowing Sewer Nation and it’s D.C. Judas Class as well as I have come to know them since being
    “bitch” slapped awake after the false-flag on 9/11, I would be MUCH more apt to believe this halt had more to do with fear of thousands of pissed-off Veterans and Indians than any “pang of conscience”. What those Israeli-trained pigs would have had to do to stop those brave hearts would have, quite possibly been the match to ignite a “REAL holocaust, not the Hollywood fairy tale type.

    http://www.ihr.org/jhr/v19/v19n3p20_radar.html

  • Richard Matthew

    what happens when Trump gets in there

    • John Cokos

      Trump has divested himself of his oil investment, which was small to begin with. He will move on. That’s the way he rolls…..

  • billdeserthills

    Wow, I didn’t know that obama was so courageous

  • Please do not stop your support for these people.
    We all want energy independence but riding rough-shod over people is not the way.
    I suspect if the effected “we the people” would been consulted they would have helped layout an agreeable pipeline path in a win-win manner. Surprisingly, it may have been the exact route they have planned with minor safeguards that the effected Indigenous People would understand, bought into and all benefited from.
    The greed of Satan’s “American Dream” [for wealth, power, fame, luxury living and instant gratification of every lust and desire] has ruined too much of our nation at the expense of “We the People” and godliness. Hopefully TRUMP now understands this and we can make our future more cohesive and productive. I’m confident the cost of this standoff exceeded the cost of an up-front compromise.

  • Rixar13

    “This announcement comes as thousands of U.S. military veterans continue to descend on Standing Rock to defend Indigenous water protectors from further police violence.”
    Thank you to my Veteran Family..! ← <3

  • Dave Johnson

    Now it’s time to make Morton County Sheriff’s Department to get punished for their crimes!

    • John Cokos

      The payback. Tied them up in Court for years, it will drain all their resources, and finally the taxpayers will demand an accounting. It’s already costing them 10 Million they don’t have.

  • Dave Johnson

    this may be a trick too, to get the veterans to leave… The Sioux Have been lied to for centuries

  • Hardlee_Ded

    The pipeline is nearly complete… this delay means nothing and it
    won’t do much more than delay construction a couple months… I think
    anyone seeing this as a victory is sadly mistaken.

    With only about
    1,100 feet of the pipeline left to complete it will be… and legally
    there is nothing beyond asking for an environmental impact study before
    granting the easement that is even going to slow the project down.

    As
    the pipeline doesn’t cross an international border they don’t need
    federal approval and any denial of the permit will be overturned by the
    courts.

    Facts:

    ” Dakota Access took a reckless gamble with
    its investor’s money when it built its pipeline to either side of the
    river without the easement…”

    “…Dallas Goldtooth of the
    Indigenous Environmental Network noted that the Obama Administration’s
    announcement that the US Army Corps will not grant DAPL the easement to
    drill under the Missouri River “is not a straight DENIAL, but rather a
    MAJOR suspension on a decision pending a limited EIS.”

    “The US
    Army Corps will conduct a limited Environmental Impact Statement on the
    river crossing and explore possibilities for alternative routes,” said
    Goldtooth.

    This delay will last until about January 20th…. and
    then all fines will be waved, permits granted and about the same time
    the border crossing for the Keystone XL will be approved so it can be
    completed as well..

    Welcome to Trumps America.

  • skyp0ckets

    I don’t believe the route under the lake is off the table, even with the Corps of Engineers. The energy company will give 2 flying fs about that. Obama effectively just kicked the can down the road, to be done with it himself. No integrity.