Dallas, TX — A Dallas SWAT officer was caught on camera threatening to break a young boy’s neck while calling him and his mother pieces of sh*t.

This stand-up cop, Terigi Rossi, was regularly featured on the TV Show, Dallas SWAT. Ironically enough, this cop had no idea he was ‘on TV’ while assaulting and threatening a woman and child.

Rossi was demoted from SWAT in 2013 after he was found asleep on the job. Since then, he’s been on the regular beat and has taken to the streets to abuse women and children.

In October 2014, a woman called 9-1-1 because her car had been towed from her apartment complex. The woman thought the call was over, so she hung up the phone. However, police considered this a 9-1-1 hang up and sent Rossi and his partner Cpl Stacy Ward to investigate.

When they showed up, Ward was cordial while Rossi seemingly treated the situation like a SWAT raid.

When the woman answered the door, she explained to the officers that she thought the call was over, so she hung up and that there was no problem.

According to his police report, Rossi said the woman became combative and was banging on the door, so he placed her under arrest. However, Rossi’s partner, Ward’s account says the exact opposite, and that the woman was not combative or violent in any way.

After seeing his stepmother taken from her house and handcuffed, the young boy, with the highest level of respect, went to ask the officer why she was being arrested.

“Don’t look at her. Look at me, cause then I’ll take you downtown, then you gotta talk, then you’re gonna go to foster care. Okay. I need to know what happened here because right now, she’s going to jail,” says Rossi, which later turns out to be nothing but lies.

“For doing what?” asks the boy.

“For not listening to me.You can act like a tough guy all you want. Okay, she’s going to jail no matter what,” lies Rossi again.

“I said nothing happened,” says the teen.

At this point, the upstanding officer walks over to the young boy, grabs him around the neck and says, “If I were you, son, I would shut the f**k up. Because I will break your f**king Neck. You understand me?”

According to WFAA, in his statement to internal investigators, Rossi said he was using “verbal judo” to try to get information from the teen. He said that telling him he would break his neck was a “verbal technique that I’ve used to try to calm down people or suspects in my career with no intention of ever meaning the words I say.”

What kind of sick and demented person thinks that threatening to kill someone would “calm them down”?

But it doesn’t stop there. In another attempt to “calm the boy and his stepmother down” Rossi called them pieces of sh*t.

After threating to kill the boy, Rossi then tells him to “Get the f*ck over here. Listen to me. You’re just like your mother. You’re a piece of f**king sh*t! You little sh*t!”

Naturally, being threatened with death and having been insulted by a person who claims to protect you, was stressful to this young man. He began to cry.

In his report, Rossi mentioned that the boy started crying, but conveniently left out the reason why. Rossi even had the audacity to say that he tried to “console” the boy!

After Rossi had assaulted a woman and a young boy, the incident was over. No one was arrested and no one was cited. The entire show was simply the product of an aggressive “hero” on a power trip.

Don’t fret, however, Rossi was in fact “punished” for threatening to kill this young boy. Last month he received a three-day paid vacation. He’s now back on the streets, likely looking for new women and children to threaten and harass.

Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Facebook.