torture

If you are a police officer in the ostensible land of the free, you can beat, harass, kidnap, and even kill innocent people—including children—and never face consequences for your actions. As the following case illustrates, police can even be caught on video torturing their restrained victims and go on to collect six-figure salaries as public servants.

Officer Charles Caruso is a bad cop and has no business carrying a badge and a gun. This is an indisputable fact as he was caught on video severely beating a non-violent and handcuffed man. However, because America refuses to hold police accountable, this threat to society still carries that badge.

Shaymond Michelson learned the hard way just how bad of a cop Caruso was. In 2014, Michelson made the terrible decision to drive drunk. He was subsequently arrested for DUI and booked into jail.

Instead of simply locking the inebriated Michelson in a cell and processing him for his crime, however, Caruso took it upon himself to inflict pain and suffering on the Navy veteran.

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Torture is defined as the infliction of intense pain to punish, coerce, or afford sadistic pleasure. As the surveillance footage from that fateful night shows, Caruso’s actions met this definition.

As the Oregonian reports, the video shows Michelson walking toward the door, handcuffed and swaying. He stops. The officer behind him is talking, nodding sharply. Then the officer shoves him. He lurches forward and plants his feet. The officer grabs his neck and throws him to his back on the concrete floor. The officer pins him there, a shin over his chest and throat. A jail deputy arrives, and Michelson kicks toward the deputy’s head. The deputy catches his foot and starts to roll him over. The officer punches him in the face. Then again and again and again and again and again.

Michelson was beaten so badly that he could barely talk from the swelling of his face. The beating was so over the top that the Eugene police department fired Caruso and gave Michelson $100,000 of taxpayer money.

While firing Caruso was a good first step, the department, nor anyone else in the city of Eugene went any further in holding this tyrant accountable. As a result, Caruso was immediately hired at another department.

If a common citizen is seen on video beating a non-violent person who poses no threat to them, rest assured they would be charged with assault and punished. If a common citizen was seen handcuffing a person and sadistically torturing them to the point of hospitalization, they would be charged with aggravated assault and would face the possibility of decades behind bars—not if you carry a badge, however.

According to the Oregonian:

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training wins national praise for holding police officers accountable for bad behavior. Academics, journalists and regulators in other states describe the department as a model.

 

But an investigation by The Oregonian/OregonLive found that state regulators took no action to sideline dozens of officers fired for chronically inept police work. Or worse.

 

The department let fired officers remain eligible to work even after they accumulated records of brutality, recklessness, shoddy investigations and anger management problems.

 

Regulators quietly closed one case after an officer was fired for using excessive force on two handcuffed suspects and for driving 120 mph, at night, through a construction zone. They closed the case of another fired officer whose disciplinary records show he botched investigations, refused to finish police reports, failed to show up at court proceedings, abused sick time and earned a reputation for being volatile and rude.

Caruso is one of these cops.

After he escaped all accountability for the sadistic torture of Michelson, Caruso was hired on as a sheriff’s deputy in Contra Costa County in California. This public servant, who preys on incapacitated, handcuffed victims, currently collects an annual salary of $140,867.49 at a job at which he’s proven to be an utter failure and a threat to society.

As TFTP has reported, Caruso is one of many cops who is used to give the illusion of accountability. They are fired from their jobs for betraying the public’s trust only to be quietly rehired by another department. This practice happens so often that there is a term for these officers—gypsy cops. 

Until police adhere to the same justice system as the rest of society, then we can expect the problem to continue or get worse. Below is one of many examples of what happens when society utterly fails at policing the police.