blue

New York, NY — Last week, a New York police officer’s association put out a video attempting to claim that being a cop is a race and that cops are subject to “blue racism” because people discriminate against them. Obviously, being a cop is not a race and there is nothing wrong with criticizing someone’s job choice. While it is irresponsible to stereotype and hate people for their job decisions, the video below shows how some cops give all other cops a bad name and stoke that discrimination.

While blue racism is a farce or red herring meant to discount the hundreds of lives brought to an untimely end every year by police, blue privilege is very real. Cops across the country have been let off with little or no punishment for unspeakable crimes—including the rape of children—yet they continue to play the role of victim when people protest or otherwise attempt to air their grievances.

Yes, many cops put their lives on the line and help and protect innocent people. However, this does not and should not grant extra rights that the rest of society is unable to obtain. Yet time and again we see police officers needlessly speeding for no reason, not wearing their seatbelts, illegally parking, beating up innocent people, and a myriad of other illegal activities that would land the common person in jail or worse. And, all of this is done with impunity for the officer.

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So, as the police union attempts to claim there is no reason for people to be upset with police, they are clearly ignoring blue privilege and the extra rights police claim for themselves. Naturally, this causes resentment.

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In the video below, submitted to us from an anonymous source, we see this blue privilege in action in New York and the result is nothing short of infuriating. If the average person wants to purchase a coffee at Starbucks, they, like everyone else, would have to park in a legal parking spot and then go inside—but not if you are a cop.

As the video begins, we see three NYPD police officers whose desire for coffee outweighed their concern for other people trying to drive on the road. Unconcerned with finding a parking spot, these officers simply parked their car in the middle of the road.

Had this been a rural area or a less busy street, perhaps it wouldn’t have been as insulting. However, this was a very busy street and police could not have cared less about creating a massive traffic problem by blocking an entire lane of traffic. After all—they had to get their Starbucks.

As the man filming shows, the officers are not responding to a call or an emergency and are only stopping for coffee. They clearly felt that their coffee was more important than all the other motorists trying to get to work or drop kids off at school or merely trying to drive somewhere without sitting in a senseless traffic jam caused by cops.

Sadly, this assumed privilege by police officers causes others to resent the blue. After all, not only were they asserting some mythical extra rights but they were causing a massive inconvenience for other people—all so they can get some coffee. Until this above the law mentality ceases, unfortunately, many people will continue to stereotype cops and the divide will grow.

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The unit number on the cruiser is 3838. Feel free to contact the NYPD here and peacefully let them know that these officers, through their careless actions, are responsible for stoking that divide.

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Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Facebook.