Home / Badge Abuse / Cops Kill Speech Impaired Autistic Man Trying to Find Safety in Home for People with Disabilities

Cops Kill Speech Impaired Autistic Man Trying to Find Safety in Home for People with Disabilities

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Hays, KS — Joseph Nathaniel Weber, 36, was described by the community and his family as a person full of life and excitement. However, on Thursday, that life was taken from him by a Hays police officer. During a traffic stop last week, Weber, who had autism, was shot and killed.

Known to family as Joey, Weber was an upstanding member of the community who learned to embrace his autism, allowing him to lead a happy and mostly normal life. Weber was employed at Joe Bob Outfitters and a member of Knights of Columbus at his church.

Weber was also a participant of New Age Services which provides activities and services to members of the community with mental disabilities — like Weber. Throughout their Facebook page, Weber is seen participating and many different events. The owner of New Age Services provides jobs to those with mental disabilities at his company, Joe Bob Outfitters — where Weber worked.

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So how could a kind, loving, and harmless man with autism, who’s had no previous run-ins with police, be gunned down in cold blood?

According to Ellis County Attorney, Thomas Drees, they don’t know.

“Did the man threaten police? I’m not going to comment on that, obviously, there was an escalation to the point where a shot was fired and he was killed,” said Drees, as reported by KSN.

According to a release from the Ellis County Attorney’s Office, as reported by KSN, Weber was stopped for an unknown traffic infraction and failed to obey the officer’s commands. As additional officers were called, he drove off and headed toward to Timber Drive.

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Timber Drive happens to be the street on which New Age Services is located. As he was startled by the officers, it is apparent Weber tried to make it to a safe space; somewhere he knew he would be okay.

However, when he got out of the car again, according to police, he did not obey their commands. However, according to his family, Weber’s autism has left him with very low verbal skills and it is possible that he simply had no idea what to do.

When someone with autism is yelled at, or experiences bright lights, loud noise, and highly stressful situations, they tend to break down. Weber was most likely going through this when police opened fire. He died at the scene.

A woman who lives next to the New Age Services home, and who witnessed some of the event, said she’s had interactions with Weber before, and they’ve been pleasant.

Weber was killed in broad daylight, in front of the place that made him feel safe.

The only details released by police so far have been the fact that none of the officers have body cameras and the patrol cars may or may not have had dash cameras.

Authorities remain tight-lipped on the details of Weber’s death five days after he was killed.

However, the case seems cut and dry. Weber had autism, a condition which causes high-stress situations such as a police stop to overwhelm him. Although police haven’t said whether or not he was armed, it is obvious that he did not have one, as this would have been the first detail released.

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When Weber attempted to go to the only place he knew that could help him, police, who clearly lacked any training in dealing with people on the autism spectrum — killed him.

If anyone would like to donate to the family, they can write a check to the Joey Weber Memorial Fund and send it to Baalmann Mortuary, PO Box 204, Oakley, KS 67748 and that will be put in his memorial fund.

  • Elizabeth Blaze

    No cameras to prove otherwise, so the cops will come up with a story of how they thought he had a weapon or he was threatening and/or violent. So of course they had to fear for their lives and gun him down.

    • billdeserthills

      Scared people shouldn’t be qualified to be police

      • Gina101

        Non-humans you mean?

        • billdeserthills

          It’s a job for an honest, honorable person, not for a criminal

    • 65snake

      Autistic people running away from you are scary!

      • Susan York

        Only if you are ignorant–as you and these cops are.

        • 65snake

          I’m so sorry that you don’t understand sarcasm. Maybe you can find a support group for that.

          • Audrey

            Perhaps you should learn that sarcasm doesn’t always translate as such on the Internet. Readers have no way of knowing your tone or inflection. And there are plenty of idiots out there who would make a statement like this.

          • 65snake

            I thought it was obviously sarcasm, even without tone, to anyone with a functioning brain.
            But yes, please, keep insulting me because you didn’t get it, and felt compelled to go straight to insults instead of just clarifying.
            Truly lovely.

          • pandorasage

            Hmm. I didn’t know it was sarcasm. ..but I am autistic. So…I guess by your logic I am lacking a functioning brain, even though many people add “(sarcasm)” to text to clarify.
            Something to ponder. ..I guess, but what would I know without a functioning brain?

          • MisgenderedToDeath

            “many people”
            Yeah, no.

          • pandorasage

            THANK you troll, for disagreeing on an opinion based on experiences I’ve had with communicating online.
            “MAny people” I’ve conversed with online use appropriate notation in text to communicate basic English.

            I’m sorry you’ve encountered so many ignorant people who lack the ability to appropriately express themselves. ( < SARCASM)

          • MisgenderedToDeath

            Just because you say things doesn’t make them true, skippy.

          • pandorasage

            🎻🎻🎻 you’re talking to yourself beyond this response. 😉👍👍✌

          • pandorasage

            🎻 see this tiny violin. ..It’s playing a sad song to go along with your life.
            LoL

      • VeryDeeplyConcerned

        It is interesting that there are no forensics.
        How was he shot, and how many times?
        Who did the shooting?
        What is the COPs story?

    • Txtraveler

      The “I *thought* he had a weapon” or “I felt my life was in danger” excuses would NEVER fly with me. If he did NOT have a weapon and you killed him because you THOUGHT he had one, it’s murder. If your life was NOT in danger, it doesn’t matter what you THOUGHT. You killed an innocent person because of your mistaken assumption. That’s murder.

      • VeryDeeplyConcerned

        One could argue manslaughter…

        • Txtraveler

          Yep, one could….good luck!

    • COPs should want cameras when there is a risk of violence. Once they have a situation, even a call, the cameras are there to protect everyone with the truth.

  • rextrek1

    More MURDER by COP cause they were “escared”……this is me F’d up shit

  • Lefty Blitzer

    Cops need a lot more training in how to deal with people with mental handicaps and issues. It would also help if police departments would stop hiring sociopaths.

    • Ibanezer Scrooge

      “Cops need a lot more training in how to deal with people”

      You could just stop that sentence right there. But, especially the mentally handicap.

    • cold340t

      They are trained in Israel. We are now ALL Palestinians.

      • Junglist For-life

        yup

      • Randy Mason

        Good one

      • watcherofolde

        STFU, moron

        • cold340t

          Thats “Moran”! Teapottyer. Learn how to spell!

    • JudgeRoyBean25

      since most of the cops have mental issues and are handicapped , you’d think they would know how to handle this situations

      • Ann Price

        JRB25, your comment is so ableist, ignorant, and anti-officer, I’m tempted to blow you off as a troll in desperate need of a hobby and an adulthood.

      • It would be interesting to se how many COPs you personally know.
        For that matter, have you ever spoken with a COP that was not pulling you over for something?

        For the most part, from what I have personally observed, they are regular folks. They choose a difficult profession and need to employ a sort of bone head command thing when on the job. Away from that they are pretty regular.

        Yes there are exceptions, some deeply concerning, but even there most are job related burn-out. Who could take the irrational abuse of folks like JudgeRoyBean25 and not get hurt and angry?

        • JudgeRoyBean25

          actually I know several, on a personal basis, not from being pulled over. nice try tho…..however you might want to ask all these “regular folks” who have badges, guns, and handcuffs, why they do nothing to clean up the mess that the most obviously flawed ones create. In my opinion those “regular folks” are no better when they allow that “brotherhood ” thing to get in the way of what’s right, ethical, legal and/or moral. None of them are doing themselves any favors when they don’t stop some out of control fool from going too far….what is too far? hmmm, how about have someone down, cuffed, and in control, yet still kneeling on their back or head, while a few more come over and work out their adrenaline rush while kicking,punching, tazing, or whatever else they do to show how pissed they are.
          By allowing that nonsense to continue they are creating an environment where the rest of the population will start fighting back…..in case you haven’t noticed, it’s already started….unfortunately it appears that the good ones are the ones getting hurt, or worse.

      • D. Tate

        If only that were true. If they had disabilities or mental illnesses, they would know a little better how to relate to people who do.

    • betty

      You could have stopped with “cops need a lot more training in how to deal with people.”

    • Linda Doucett

      Bullshit… this is getting worse not better… They ARE being trained … in Israel. Any wonder you see this more and more? http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Senior-US-law-enforcement-officials-visiting-to-study-Israeli-counterterrorism-ops-434709

      • Larry Saltzman

        Training cops in Israel is guaranteed to turn those cops into thugs and killers.

      • Klas Kiander

        That’s some bullshit right there, if you believe a handful of senior officers being trained in Israel to counter terrorism has ANYTHING to do with how day-to-day officers do their job, you need to wake up. 50-80 people getting training won’t in any way affect the tens of thousands of officers in employment, they all need real education, in how to properly deal with these type of situations, and they need to go back to aiming school as well, its not fucking hard to shoot someone and not kill them, that should never be the cop’s job. This isn’t Nazi Germany, we don’t have officers out in the streets to execute people.

        • Randy Mason

          “This isn’t Nazi Germany’ Our country is giving the country of Nazi’s (Israel) an extreme amount of money. Our military police force in society treats non whites as Israel treats the indigenous of that area, the Palestinians! Israel citizens are nothing more than imports from Russia and a few other countries. They are psychopaths!!!!!

      • watcherofolde

        Fucking NUTZ

    • Lars Erik Grambo

      The united states of America needs to learn from police-schools here in Norway.
      Police training here is the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree, requiring 6 full semesters (3 years). That may seem like a lot, but if you look at the results, you will see those three years makes a massive difference.

      • This is a great point!

        There is clear evidence that not carrying firearms and training the police have an effect on police related violence.

        https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/02/05/norway-gave-its-cops-guns-after-1-year-its-taking-them-away-what-did-it-learn/

        It would be interesting to see what the non-gun related violence statistics are like. And what the general level of violence per-capita is.

        @Lars – do you have any data on that?

        • Lars Erik Grambo

          Sorry, but no. I do not have any data to show you. Only got the local public opinion of police here in Norway, and the fact that police killing people is practically unheard of here, to actually base that on.

          But many has done deep comparisons. I belive The Young Turks has made several videos related to comparing US and norwegian prison and police systems as well. If you want data, I suggest you start looking there.

  • Nishi

    This must be part of the new extreme citizenship test. Can you obey LE and follow their commands to their satisfaction under any circumstances?

    • This was investigated and a movie made of the results.

      http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3726704/ The Experimenter

      They expected to find blind obedience in Germans, but in establishing a baseline found it was in Americans too!

      It is hard to know what one would do in a stressful situation.

  • Duane Weimerskirch

    kill chicken shit cops instantly and no trial. they denied this kid due process therefore they should be denied due process.

    • elropo

      Maybe they need a fund to hire hit men, Mafia where are you.

    • VeryDeeplyConcerned

      Use cases like this to require transparency and accountability in all public servants.

      No more secret court hearings

      No more closed door executive meetings

      Expose the tax collectors to audit!

      Make it all public and broadcast on the internet.

  • ben dover

    ARE YOU FELLOW CITIZENS READY TO REVOLT AND STOP THE TYRANNY THAT IS BEING AFFLICTED ON US MORE AND MORE , NOT LESS AND LESS. I AM! FIRST STEP IS TO LET COPS CARRY THERE OWN INSURANCE ,INSTEAD OF YOU AND I THE TAX PAYERS FLIPPING THE BILL AND LETTING COPS RESIGN JUST TO GET ANOTHER JOB IN ANOTHER DEPARTMENT. 2 GET RID OF POLICE UNIONS,THEY DO NOTHING BUT BACK THE BLUE LINE AS THEY CAN NOT ADMIT TO ANY WRONG, 3 POBAR NEEDS TO GO, YOU KNOW OUR CONSTITUTIONAL BILL OF RIGHTS! WELL COPS GET THERE OWN POBAR POLICE OFFICERS BILL OF RIGHTS, THAT SH1T NEEDS TO GO. I GREW UP KNOWING ALL THE COPS IN MY TOWN I GREW UP IN I CAN TELL YOU THAT 75 PERCENT WERE SICK PEOPLE BULLIES AND ADONIS COMPLEX . COPS NOT ALL BUT MOST ARE IN FOR THE 20 YR AND OUT PROGRAM. ENOUGH IS ENOUGH. MY THEORY AFTER DEALING WITH COPS ON A COMMUNITY LEVEL ARE THIS……DEAD COPS CAN DO NO HARM…. STAND UP AND FIGHT! EVERY NOW AND THEN THE TREE OF LIBERTY NEEDS TO BE SHAKEN AND SOME BLOOD LETTING TO HAPPEN FOR THEN THE WOUNDS MAY HEAL……….

    • I suggest nobody take insurrection advice from a guy named “Ben Dover”

      • ben dover

        I suggest that you should look up what real sir names may be. I am a true Patriot and my lineage goes back to the founding fathers. I sure as hell can not use my real name. And if i may ask you what dont you agree with in previous post

        • 1. You’re a true patriot? You’re not even patriotic enough to stand by your own words. You’re a coward hiding behind an anonymous identity.

          2. My lineage also goes back to the Founding Fathers. Everyone’s lineage goes back somewhere. I’m unimpressed. Just because your ancestors are notable does not mean you are.

          3. I don’t read all-cap rants.

    • elropo

      It is the only thing that will work, kill someone in my family and all hell won’t save you

    • AQ

      Kindly sit your ridiculous ass down.

      Also, CapsLock is NOT cruise control for cool.

  • Ta2ed Warrior

    How many more before communities begin having discussions about these violent acts by those entrusted to prevent violent acts? The cover-ups, the lies and the lack of justice comes from the top down. It needs to stop. We are the only ones who can stop it. Those in power are corrupt and in deep being a part of the problem. We can’t wait until “they” do something. “They” is us. Cops are committing just as much violence as they stop. I haven’t needed one ever.

    • elropo

      So much truth in one comment, will everyone need to “carry” in order to be safe from the police.

      • Brenda

        That’s what got that black man in Minnesota killed after being stopped for a “taillight”, his girlfriend told the police that he had a gun, BUT he had a license to carry… it was in the video. Did you watch that video. The idea that we should all carry would make sense if we were all white men… for us brown people, it’s the fasted way to get shot and killed by police, even if you have a legal right, a registered weapon and a license to carry.

        • VeryDeeplyConcerned

          There are some videos of a white man carrying a rifle in a suburban neighborhood and the police responded, talked to him and released him.

          Then a black man, same action, and the cops presented with drawn weapons and took him into custody, while his pregnant wife made a video of it all.

          Yes, there is a lot of social change that is needed.

        • pandorasage

          This comment makes no sense considering the person killed in this article was a WHITE MAN with autism.
          Disabled people are abused by police More than black people.

          Let’s not miss a chance to race bait though ..

          • Brenda

            The analogy is obviously lost on your, that does not mean it doesn’t make sense, That just means that you don’t understand the analogy… but nice of you to make it about race, when it clearly was not.

          • The experiment with legally carrying a firearm shows we still have stereotypes and prejudice. And that the police need to learn how to handle different situations.

            The original article is about police responding to a situation they did not understand, with extreme violence.

            What is missing is clear evidence of what “threat” the perceived. From the accounts the victim was running away from the police, towards a place of safety. If that is the case, the police have committed a terrible error. If the fellow charged them with the car (no evidence or even credible allegation there), then there *might* me justification.

            Hopefully, there will be more information released over time.

          • pandorasage

            How did I make it about race? You pulled a race card. I stated a statistical fact.
            And yes, your emotionally driven logic is lost on me.

    • atropos_of_nothing

      When their citizens make enough noise about it, a lot of cities and communities have been organizing citizen review boards with the police departments, often specifically dedicated to reviewing incidents and complaints involving racial profiling and use of force. It is slow going, as is any work undertaken within a civic government, but they are proving to be more and more effective.
      After the simple fact of open public review of cases and complaints, one of the most effective initiatives so far has been organizing citizen-law enforcement encounter events, usually informal barbecues or whatnot. It sounds hokey, like a freakin cookout is going to solve all our social justice issues, but it goes a really long way toward humanizing, creating empathy, in a circuit. The cops have more chances, more impetus, to view the people they police as actual humans. The citizens have more chances, and more impetus, to understand those experiences and mindsets which make that difference, between “police” and “civilian.”
      And I don’t mean that like, “we have to understand where they’re coming from, you’d do the same thing!” We have to understand the mindset that’s being instilled, the culture which is being created, before we can ever hope to formulate a solution. (No small part of that culture and mindset is coming from the same places all the rest of us are drawing our influences, and *that* realization is going to prove vital to shutting this nonsense down.)

  • Maukwa

    For one thing, not that it matters now, but with as severe as it sounds that his disability was, why did he have a car and driver’s license? He could not explain himself, or understand what to do. He should not have been driving for his own safety. So sad.

    • DennyMD

      Great, just avoid the actual issue with a stupid comment!
      Maybe you should go back and s-l-ow-l-y read the article again…

      • Maukwa

        It is not a stupid comment. Just because it does not fit into your thought process, does not mean it is stupid. I lost a grandson with severe autism, who probably functioned at the level of this young man, and he would have never been driving a car, even though technically, he could have. Grow up and open your brain to what other’s are saying.

        • RJ Rodrigue

          yes it is a stupid comment. he obviously passed his drivers license and was able to understand whats needed to drive. I do not recall hearing anything where he was a risk to anyone or himself. You can not blame him for the actions of a trigger happy pig. Perhaps you should be questioning the mental capacity of the pig? Seems they justify gunning people down just for not following orders.

          • Maukwa

            To keep arguing with me when my point is valid…is stupid…how’s that?

        • Susan York

          Your comment is stupid and ignorant of autism. So easy to sit back and pass judgment on something of which you know nothing.

          • Maukwa

            I know nothing about autism????? You ignorant person…how do you know what I know…read what I wrote you idiot!

          • Audrey

            You can’t second-guess this young man’s readiness for a driver’s license based on where your grandson was on the spectrum. It’s clear that you have first-hand experience but little knowledge of the disorder.

          • Scott Hughes

            I have autism (Aspergers) and if you believe you can judge us any of us with nothing but your experience with your grandchild and the bare minimum information then you are sorely ignorant to the condition. Autism is a very broad spectrum and each of us are as different to each other as a person can be to another person.

            The reason he was unable to explain himself is not because he is incapable of it. It was because the extreme stress of the situation impaired his ability to organise his thought correctly, and as things escalated he panicked and obviously tried to reach someone that could help him. But the officer as incompetent as they were, was unable to recognise his distress.

          • Maukwa

            Look! I have credentials which qualify me to give the information that I am giving…I am not, however, going to display them on a thread like this one. If you have Asperger’s Syndrome, you do not have autism, but are a person who has a syndrome which falls into the “autism spectrum”….

          • Scott Hughes

            Aspergers is classed as high functioning autism and I dont know if it happened, but for a while there was consideration for it to be removed from the DSM and for those with it to simply be regarded as such. So despite what you (And many others) may believe, I as well as anyone else with a disability which falls on the spectrum, would be considered to be autistic.

            You have credentials? Strange, seems that would be the first thing one would normally bring up in a conversation about their knowledge on the subject and not just personal experiences. Any qualified person should know better than to just paint everyone on the spectrum with the one brush.

          • Maukwa

            No one is “autistic”! They “have” autism….

          • Scott Hughes

            If you have autism you are autistic, just like having dyslexia means you are dyslexic.

    • anna miller

      Exactly my thought Maukwa.

    • T2588

      I thought that, too.
      I worked with high functioning autistic adults. I wouldn’t trust them to be able to act appropriately when stressed by outside or internal stimulii, even if they were fully capable of being be to drive.

      • Brittany

        Thanks… pay us more through the government so we can afford taxis the rest of our lives.

    • Bev

      This is an example of how functioning labels and the ideas behind them fail. Uneven ability profiles are extremely common in autism. I am autistic. Some people might claim I shouldn’t drive, but I have done so successfully for 40 years now. If you are at all interested in learning beyond your own experience with one person, here is one explanation of the phenomenon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WK144ZdxFU

      • Maukwa

        You are in the spectrum, you are not “autistic”….my grandson was non verbal, could not even wipe his own butt, but he could have driven a car, put any puzzle with a thousand pieces together, work computers, remember the words to any Lion King song after hearing it one time…etc. There are many aspects to autism and you do not have “autism”….you are probably in the Asperger’s category at best….this young man should not have been driving a car if he could not explain himself, and follow directions from the police…period!

  • verySladEn420

    It seems like whenever they know they are guilty, they automatically claim there was no cameras. Scary times we live in, and I bet we are still in the desensitization stage.

    • Brenda

      Yep! All of a sudden, there are no body cams, no dash cams, nothing but the words of those who committed the crime. Yep, push a cop, spend two years in jail, and then a cop KILLS a disabled man, nope, no one, watch for it, NO ONE will be charged with a crime. Victim blaming. Yeah, a scared man, looking for a safe place is dead, and it’s his fault for being scared and looking for a safe place instead of taking abuse from a belligerent cop.

  • Guy

    There are no words that can describe what I feel for this youn man and his family as the result of this senseless murder by cop !

    Mark my words. Some how the DA & Chief will find it to be Justified. The words, After Thorough Investigation, Fear For Lives, Transparency & Community Trust will be used. Conveniently No Video Made. Years Of Secrecy Kept and payment made !

    And the brave men and women in blue who are payed to keep us safe !? Will continue to do so, in there own brutish fashion ! God Help Us All !

    • Ed

      We can hope the civil suit will bring out the TRUTH!

  • anna miller

    Those who watch TV and read mainstream news outlets are all convinced that terrorism is on every corner. Police are being trained by Israeli tactics from a police state. The police are being trained to view the public as the enemy. The police are high-strung now, over-reacting.
    I do have to question however, first a deaf man and now an autistic enough person to be in a special training center. Do the guardians of these individuals know the dangers involved?
    Not being able to hear, and freaking out under pressure, might not be such good candidates for driving.

    • Brittany

      considering most places in the US have poor or no public transportation, what else are we supposed to do? Do you expect disabled to have to ride bikes which are also dangerous or walk everywhere??? Doesn’t seem fair.

      • anna miller

        Perhaps the training center in which this man attended had transportation buses? They usually do. There are usually dial-a-rides also transporting the disabled. Obviously, if this man’s parents had to do it over again, they would question the wisdom of allowing their son to drive.
        Fleeing after being pulled over by a cop these days, shows impairment of judgement. Of course the cop who shot this man should be held liable. It was totally unecessary and wrong.

    • Brenda

      Yeah, that’s a solution. Let’s not allow people with disabilities to drive because there are so many other ways they can get around. Lets make them even more disabled by taking away the things they can actually do so the people we hire to protect us, and them, won’t kill them. How is that even logical????

      • anna miller

        People with certain disabilities such as being completely deaf, could be a hazard to other drivers in traffic, likewise a person who is so autistic they speed off in a car when pulled over by a cop. Are some cops out of control? YES. But let us not throw out common sense in the rush to judgement.

        • Susan York

          Your rush to judgment is entirely without knowledge of autism and common sense.

          • anna miller

            How do you know I have no knowledge of autism? As a matter of fact I worked for a time in an institution housed with autistic adults. There are variations of limitations. Obviously this man lost his bearings and took off after being pulled over by police. Unfortunately this cost him his life. It was over-reaction on the part of the police, but that is today’s environment. Perhaps if his parent’s understood the situation with police today, and an autistic’s unrealiable emotional responses, they would have not let him drive.
            Now that is prudence and common sense. It is scary enough for people with clear thinking and control of their emotions.
            Stop insulting people who have a different opinion, it’s adolescent mentality. And our culture is rife with such mentality.

          • Susan York

            You refer to a human being as “an autistic.” That is an insult. And it confirms my original opinion.

          • anna miller

            Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) the task of driving may prove
            particularly difficult. Along with the impulsivity, inexperience, and
            other traits of adolescence and young adulthood that can make driving a
            challenge, an individual with ASD may find him- or herself struggling
            with potential obstacles posed by autism itself. Can he or she quickly
            intuit and react to the “big picture” of any given driving situation?
            Can he or she interpret and respond to the actions, attitudes, or
            intentions of other drivers? Can he or she keep calm, neither overly
            anxious nor angry? Can he or she avoid “zoning out”? Individuals with ASD can have a hard time reading the “body language” of other people: expressions, gestures, stances. https://iancommunity.org/cs/adults/driving_with_asd
            The researchers found that, on average, adults with autism earn their
            drivers’ licenses at later ages, drive less frequently and put more
            restrictions on their driving. These self-imposed limits include not
            driving on highways or at night. Adult drivers with autism also reported
            more traffic violations, on average, than did a comparison group of
            drivers without autism. Adults with ASD have said they find it beneficial to tape a paper to
            their driver’s license that says, “I have an autism spectrum disorder
            and may not understand questions asked verbally,” or something similar,
            so that if they are pulled over, they can convey to the police officer
            that they are not under the influence or intentionally not following
            commands.

          • Brenda

            Thank you, Susan. I always shake my head in disbelief when I read comments by people who are so ignorant. In this day and age with so many autistic people in this country, it’s truly baffling that so many choose to remain ignorant to the limitations, and abilities, most autistic people have. Ugh.

  • Why the fuck don’t those cops have dash cams and body cams?

    • Lisa Boyd

      Because its too hard to get rid of the evidence

    • There probably were, but they just said there weren’t so they wouldn’t have to open themselves up to prosecution.

  • Tmoney

    Doesn’t everyone feel safer? I know everyone in Hays can breathe a sigh of relief that this church going volunteer autistic man has been taken off the streets and put down like the hardened criminal he was.

  • outlaw63

    comply or die

  • steve

    So I will always keep saying. We are all expendable in the eyes of the law.

  • Naia McCoy

    This is their job and don’t we all have accountability at our jobs? Doctors, nurses, teachers, & social workers..but cops are NOT held accountable? I think instead of a memorial fund they need to sue the cop!

    • Travis Bryan Ross

      Their job is not to kill people.

  • valvepop

    if it had been a black man who was killed we could have all waited on Big Al, coming to town with the BLM losers to burn Hays down.

    • Jules Badguy

      Al clearly has a point. Unless this poor guy was a “Thug” too.

  • Michael Weis

    That’s plain murder! Cops are corwardish idiotic bastards! Murder protected by uniform I say!

  • PollyTickle1

    autistic lives matter too 🙁

  • challengeauthority

    “Suppose there were a gang…

    … A gang which required members to rape, pillage, and attack people as a condition of membership. A gang which financed all its activities, and bought all its clothing and equipment, with money it stole from the local population. A gang which bragged about driving nice cars stolen from people they attacked. Any member who didn’t commit those acts on a regular basis would be kicked out, and quite probably be subject to revenge by the other members.

    As a condition of gang membership, you are agreeing to pretend other people’s property rights can’t apply to you. You pretend no one has the right of association where you are concerned- if someone tries to walk away when you insist on talking to them, the gang’s rules say you can murder them. If someone tries to defend themselves from unwanted physical contact- or from even worse- the gang’s rules say you can murder them. The rules you impose on others don’t apply to you.

    If you are a member of this gang you are openly admitting support for what the gang does. When you wear the gang colors, you are identifying yourself as a member in good standing. You are leaving no room for mistaken impressions of what you are, what you do, and what you support.

    Any non-member caught wearing the gang colors or claiming to be a member would be kidnapped and caged, robbed, and quite possibly killed by actual members of the gang. The membership must be kept pure. There is no room for pretenders.

    Sometimes the gang’s members actually do helpful things. This is what the gang and its supporters want everyone believing the gang is all about, but it is actually a small and uncommon part of what the gang does. In fact, it is rare enough to be newsworthy when it happens.

    The rapes, theft, and murders committed in the name of the gang are said to be committed by a “few bad apples”, even though a “good apple” who didn’t do those things- or at least turn a blind eye to those who do- would be kicked out of the gang and targeted for revenge. By staying in the gang, a member is endorsing all the gang’s activities- official and unofficial.

    The gang has done a good job convincing your family, friends, and neighbors that without them, other gangs would commit the same acts, but that this would somehow be worse; it would be chaos and mean the end of civilization. It is a lie, but few are willing to admit they are being lied to, and many actually believe it is true.

    “Polite society”- particularly including newspapers and television and radio stations- ignores the nature of the gang, and instead praises the members for the few good deeds done- deeds that don’t require gang membership to perform. They also ignore the evil nature of the acts that only members of the gang can get away with committing. Those who refuse to ignore the institutional evil are ostracized.

    When a member of the gang gets killed while wearing the gang colors, “Polite Society” weeps and wails and tears at its clothing, acting as though the death came out of nowhere and was completely beyond understanding. No matter what the gang members have done recently, and no matter that the supposed “good apples” didn’t disavow the acts of the members who committed the acts. Polite Society demands everyone weep and wail along with them, and voice their loyalty to the gang over and over again, lest they be thought of as horrible, uncivilized monsters.

    I’m not Polite Society. I can’t grieve when members of the gang are killed. Even if they weren’t currently attacking the innocent, by remaining in the gang and wearing the gang colors openly, they are declaring themselves an enemy to everything good and civilized. How can anyone see the deaths of these gang members as a “bad thing”?

    Well, this gang actually does exist. It infests every town and city in America, and in most of the world. They are the police- the Blue Line Gang (in America). They pretend they have no choice in the acts they commit because politicians made up “laws” by saying magic words which made their perverted opinions “official”. Never mind that Nuremberg proved this to be a worthless defense. Individually, they each have the ability to refuse to do evil, even if a politician says they must. And, if a person can’t avoid committing these acts without removing himself from the Blue Line Gang, then to be a good person he MUST quit the gang, regardless of the personal costs. If I have a job and my boss tells me I am required to overcharge a customer or lose my job, I can’t remain in the job and still be a decent person. It simply isn’t possible.

    It doesn’t matter if you believe these “laws” are a good idea, or even “necessary”. It doesn’t matter if the lack of them scares you. Any “law” which seeks to control something other than aggression or property violations is a counterfeit “law”- the few that are left are unnecessary laws.

    In the absence of police some people might get away with violating life, liberty, and property of others. The existence of police guarantees it.

    This is why there is no such thing as a “good cop”, and why there can never be. It is self contradictory.

    The police is where the boot heel of tyranny meets the human face. Without them no evil ruler could impose his will on large numbers of people- people would simply kill him in self defense. Which is why politicians work so hard to whip up support for cops.

    No good person can remain consistently good and continue to support the police. It simply isn’t possible. I know good people who do support the police, but by doing so they are being inconsistent, and actually being evil at that moment. Withdraw your support; be a good person all the time.

    The sooner you accept it, internalize it, and act on it, the sooner you will be free.”

  • AQ

    OK, I need to call you out on your gross ableism and erasure.

    First off: Person-first language (e.g. “person with autism”) is erasing and belittling–autism is a part of who he was and was an integral part of his identity. He was an autistic man, and autism was part of his identity.

    Second: autism is not “a condition”. That is ableist language and implies that the autist is somehow damaged or broken, and that they’ll “get better” or magically become neurotypical.

    Third: Not every autist responds in the same way to high-stress situations. DO NOT FUCKING GENERALIZE.

    Fourth: Autism is a spectrum, and people on the Spectrum are just as varied as you neurotypicals. Some of us are verbal, others not. Some of us do not have a concurrent intellectual disability, and some do. Some have mental illnesses like Major Depressive Disorder and PTSD to go along with our autism thanks to years of abuse from family and others that hate us because our brains shipped with a different operating system.

    And so on.

    It’s not too much to ask for you NTs to actually learn something from actual autistic people before running off at the mouth and showing your gross ableism. Seriously.

    • Linda Gunderson

      Actually, stating a person with autism is CORRECT, I work in Special Education and we no longer are allowed/supposed to say “autistic_____(name)”.

      • AQ

        No, you ableist shitlord, it is NOT correct. Also, your work in Special Education means exactly ZERO compared to MY OWN LIVED EXPERIENCE AS AN AUTISTIC PERSON.

        But thanks for confirming that you’re ableist and that you think it’s A-OK to abuse autistic children.

      • AQ

        Stating “a person with autism” is NOT correct. It is ERASING of our identity. You are a disgusting ableist piece of garbage, lady.

    • MisgenderedToDeath

      Settle down, Beavis.

      • AQ

        No, I will not “settle down”.

  • Christopher Eckman

    First, black people have been targeted; now people with disabilities. When will this senseless violence end?

    • Nicolae Crefelean

      I couldn’t say if someone is targeted. It looks like mistakes – huge ones, obviously. Mistakes can happen even in the police force. The police officers are not saints, nor perfect, so I can understand that.

      What I can’t stand, though, is covering up these cases with a lot of bullshit excuses like “he didn’t comply”, “he seemed threatening”, “he ran away” or whatever else. Since when does the police have to shoot to kill instead of disabling an alleged perpetrator?

      Sure, “disabling” can be problematic. There doesn’t seem to be a 100% safe method for that, but I can’t explain how someone can get killed so easily, and if they shoot, why don’t they shoot in the shoulders, legs or somewhere where you don’t kill but stop an alleged threat, so you can actually get answers from the person who got shot, especially from people who can’t talk at all or freak out for whatever reason.

      There’s a good point though about giving driving licenses to people who can’t handle driving like most people – good hearing, ability to interact with the authorities or other traffic participants and so on. Now for the hearing part, self-driving cars might be a solution, and marking the vehicles with signs like “hearing impaired”, or (for privacy) simply mark the license as such in the system, so the police officers can quickly get this info.

      Whatever the faults of “the system”, we still have to acknowledge the fact that this is not generalized. Generalizing is a huge problem. Every lost life is one too many, but as sad as it is, we can’t just say someone is targeted by the police. It just means that every now and then the police fails miserably at protecting and serving. Penalties should be applied, compensations as well, and the problems fixed to the best possible.

      There are all terrible happenings, but going overboard and hold a grudge on just about every police officer for some stupid and uncalled for killings is not fair to all the honest, brave and hard working officers who keep the people safe most of the time.

    • There are police that target white people too – they are equal opportunity believers…

      The problem is not the victim or the pathology of the COP, it is a system issue.

      The system does not have sufficient disincentives for using deadly force.
      I have seen COPs unholster their service weapon, on rude and disrespectful kids!
      Yes the kids needed something, but not a bullet!

      This unfortunate fellow likely disrespected a COP that was so insecure that he felt justified in killing someone that – apparently – presented no lethal threat. And arguably appeared to be seeking refuge.

      IMHO: This sounds like a Barney Fife case – gone very bad.

  • politicaljules

    He was armed. A car is a deadly weapon. Especially when you drive off to run from police. You would not give a person with autism a gun if the cannot make sound judgements. Why on earth would you let him get behind the wheel of a car??? When you KNOW he gets overwhelmed by stressful situations!! This was a ticking time bomb. Thank God he did not lose it and plow into a group of kids. If a person is so excitable and unable to follow simple directions with out running away in a moving vehicle, THEY SHOULD NOT BE DRIVING!! Whoever gave him the keys to that car is liable!

    • willytee

      THE STATE THAT GAVE HIM HIS DRIVERS LICENSE? GFY

    • JB

      He drove the speed limit and followed traffic laws while “fleeing”. IE: He did not put anyone on the road in any appreciable danger.

    • AQ

      So you believe that the police had every right to murder a disabled man in cold blood, then?

      Let me guess, you also think that the disabled don’t deserve to live, period.

  • Linda Gunderson

    I’ve worked with children and teenagers with autism for seven years and many discussions have come up among staff members about those driving with autism. Driving a cais a HUGE responsibility and liabilityt is not just a physical operation of a vehicle but an ability to react emotionally to some very stressful situations, whether in traffic or with officers controlling traffic. I am not condoning the shooting of an unarmed special needs person however an individual who is incapable of following an officers orders and does not know the LEGAL procedure is at risk of being treated like a criminal. I am sure we need to go back to the physicians who sign these physical forms in order for the special needs individuals to obtain a license in the first place.

    • Brittany

      considering most places in the US have poor or no public transportation, what else are we supposed to do? Do you expect disabled to have to ride bikes which are also dangerous or walk everywhere??? Doesn’t seem fair.Give us enough money to take a taxi daily and better access to public transport without being auto denied for not being disabled enough to take the disabled one. ?

      • Linda Gunderson

        I understand it is a serious dilemma, and very inconvenient and I am compassionate. But as the mother of two young drivers, now 19 and 21, the liability of them getting behind a wheel when they are inexperienced has often crossed my mind. Driving is a RESPONSIBILITY, not knowing to stop when a police officer has his lights on makes one wonder if that person was up to the task of driving. Submitting to authority while operating a vehicle is pretty important. By the way, my father was blind, and we walked a lot when I was a child because my mother did not know how to drive and it was several years before she learned how. Not saying it was easy.

        • Lisa Boyd

          Do you have any evidence that an autistic person is a more dangerous driver than the average 80 year old? Or the average driver ? How about the people driving down the road doing selfie road songs? This is only talking point the LEO’s have. And it isn’t even a good one.

          • Linda Gunderson

            It’s a good question, Lisa Boyd, and one that begs an answer. Every individual is different. And I do believe we need answers, not only to protect these drivers who are on the spectrum, but also to protect others on the road. Here are two decent links I found, one was by a driving school–I found it very interesting that they give some general guidelines of those who probably SHOULDN’T be driving. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/27/the-challenge-of-driving-with-aspergers/?_r=0
            http://www.heightsdriving.com/senior-evaluation-disability-driving-school-asperger.html
            In my experience with teens and children, I can think of more kids at least that I’ve worked with, that SHOULDN’T get a license, than those that could potentially. Does IQ play a factor as well? I think it does. Some have a normal IQ others are very low. All of these factors need to be taken into account.

    • AQ

      Please stop with the Person-First language. It is erasing of our identities as autists and it is ableist as hell.

      • Linda Gunderson

        Please refrain from using profanity to get a point across, it is not necessary and it comes across as disrespectful. Thank you.

        • Anger and undisciplined actions are at the core of this situation.
          If the man was cooperative and the cops kept to the rules, this would have never gotten this far…

        • AQ

          Fuck your tone-policing. I will use whatever language I feel is necessary, and I do not care what an ableist shitlord like you thinks.

        • AQ

          “Hell” is not profanity.

          Furthermore, fuck your tone-policing, you ableist neurotypical piece of trash.

          Person-First Language is ableist and it is erasing of our identities. Autism is not a disease or a condition. It is who we are. So please take your pearl-clutching nonsense and fuck off.

  • J Victor Escano

    Might as well just line up to be executed by your neighborhood police in case you have a death wish or suicidal tendencies. Between Al-Qaida, Isis, and sociopathic terrorists we don’t have to worry about population overgrowth now.

  • Ed

    Suppose There Were a Gang…
    by Kent McManigal
    Suppose there were a gang… A gang which required members to rape, pillage, and attack people as a condition of membership. A gang which financed all its activities, and bought all its clothing and equipment, with money it stole from the local population. A gang which bragged about driving nice cars stolen from people they attacked. Any member who didn’t commit those acts on a regular basis would be kicked out, and quite probably be subject to revenge by the other members.

    As a condition of gang membership, you are agreeing to pretend other people’s property rights can’t apply to you. You pretend no one has the right of association where you are concerned—if someone tries to walk away when you insist on talking to them, the gang’s rules say you can murder them. If someone tries to defend themselves from unwanted physical contact—or from even worse—the gang’s rules say you can murder them. The rules you impose on others don’t apply to you.

    If you are a member of this gang you are openly admitting support for what the gang does. When you wear the gang colors, you are identifying yourself as a member in good standing. You are leaving no room for mistaken impressions of what you are, what you do, and what you support.

    Any non-member caught wearing the gang colors or claiming to be a member would be kidnapped and caged, robbed, and quite possibly killed by actual members of the gang. The membership must be kept pure. There is no room for pretenders.

    Sometimes the gang’s members actually do helpful things. This is what the gang and its supporters want everyone believing the gang is all about, but it is actually a small and uncommon part of what the gang does. In fact, it is rare enough to be newsworthy when it happens.

    The rapes, theft, and murders committed in the name of the gang are said to be committed by a “few bad apples”, even though a “good apple” who didn’t do those things—or at least turn a blind eye to those who do—would be kicked out of the gang and targeted for revenge. By staying in the gang, a member is endorsing all the gang’s activities—official and unofficial.

    The gang has done a good job convincing your family, friends, and neighbors that without them, other gangs would commit the same acts, but that this would somehow be worse; it would be chaos and mean the end of civilization. It is a lie, but few are willing to admit they are being lied to, and many actually believe it is true.

    “Polite society”—particularly including newspapers and television and radio stations—ignores the nature of the gang, and instead praises the members for the few good deeds done—deeds that don’t require gang membership to perform. They also ignore the evil nature of the acts that only members of the gang can get away with committing. Those who refuse to ignore the institutional evil are ostracized.

    When a member of the gang gets killed while wearing the gang colors, “Polite Society” weeps and wails and tears at its clothing, acting as though the death came out of nowhere and was completely beyond understanding. No matter what the gang members have done recently, and no matter that the supposed “good apples” didn’t disavow the acts of the members who committed the acts. Polite Society demands everyone weep and wail along with them, and voice their loyalty to the gang over and over again, lest they be thought of as horrible, uncivilized monsters.

    I’m not Polite Society. I can’t grieve when members of the gang are killed. Even if they weren’t currently attacking the innocent, by remaining in the gang and wearing the gang colors openly, they are declaring themselves an enemy to everything good and civilized. How can anyone see the deaths of these gang members as a “bad thing”?

    Well, this gang actually does exist. It infests every town and city in America, and in most of the world. They are the police—the Blue Line Gang (in America). They pretend they have no choice in the acts they commit because politicians made up “laws” by saying magic words which made their perverted opinions “official”. Never mind that Nuremberg proved this to be a worthless defense. Individually, they each have the ability to refuse to do evil, even if a politician says they must. And, if a person can’t avoid committing these acts without removing himself from the Blue Line Gang, then to be a good person he MUST quit the gang, regardless of the personal costs. If I have a job and my boss tells me I am required to overcharge a customer or lose my job, I can’t remain in the job and still be a decent person. It simply isn’t possible.

    It doesn’t matter if you believe these “laws” are a good idea, or even “necessary”. It doesn’t matter if the lack of them scares you. Any “law” which seeks to control something other than aggression or property violations is a counterfeit “law”—the few that are left are unnecessary laws.

    In the absence of police some people might get away with violating life, liberty, and property of others. The existence of police guarantees it.

    This is why there is no such thing as a “good cop”, and why there can never be. It is self contradictory.

    The police is where the boot heel of tyranny meets the human face. Without them no evil ruler could impose his will on large numbers of people—people would simply kill him in self defense. Which is why politicians work so hard to whip up support for cops.

    No good person can remain consistently good and continue to support the police. It simply isn’t possible. I know good people who do support the police, but by doing so they are being inconsistent, and actually being evil at that moment. Withdraw your support; be a good person all the time.

    The sooner you accept it, internalize it, and act on it, the sooner you will be free.

  • Ed

    The whole good cop/bad cop question can be disposed of much more decisively. We need not enumerate what proportion of cops appears to be good or listen to someone’s anecdote about his Uncle Charlie, an allegedly good cop. We need only consider the following: (1) a cop’s job is to enforce the laws, all of them; (2) many of the laws are manifestly unjust, and some are even cruel and wicked; (3) therefore every cop has agreed to act as an enforcer for laws that are manifestly unjust or even cruel and wicked. There are no good cops. ~Robert Higgs

  • timpundit

    Cocksuckers. I do not give police the benfit of the doubt anymore esp when the dead person was unarmed.

  • Big Boss

    All cops are bastards.

  • Dennis

    PROSECUTE THAT POS COP FOR MURDER PUT HIM IN JAIL FOR LIFE FUCK HIM!

  • Clarence Wagner

    One way I thought might work is having a net gun in the trunk if you don’t see a gun get the net out and do like they do with animals, and I don’t mean to demean a human just try to save lives

  • fbp

    The police should only use deadly force, when there is no alternative.

    If someone is walking away from them, or even resisting arrest, that is not justification.

    It is regrettable that these things continue to happen.

    More than a decade ago, there was a non-verbal autistic man who was maced to death for resisting arrest – and hiding in the back of a women’s clothing store. He presented to threat no anyone and only responded to assault and battery of the police by defending himself.

    That may be against the law, but nothing worth killing over.

    • What should be done with a COP that killed an innocent?

      Definitely pull is right to carry a firearm.

      Yes, try him for murder and manslaughter.

      If guilty, then what?

      More murder or life?

      Or maybe order non-violent training
      and 10,000 hours teaching non-violence to other COPs?

  • Tooguud

    FUCKING TRIGGER HAPPY ASSHOLES !!!

  • Mark Stahl

    I work for an organization that offers services to the developmentally disabled. One of the things about this case to keep in mind is that this took place in a small town in west central Kansas. Given that state’s economy and the fact that they’ve had to slash so many public programs/services, I can completely understand if the facility was forced to rely on volunteers to transport individuals, if there is any transport available. It would also explain a lack of police body/dash cams. Doesn’t justify what happened, but it answers a couple supporting questions.

    • Lisa Boyd

      They don’t want body cams because it is hard enough to get rid of the dash cam evidence

  • verySladEn420

    Approximately 13 families rule it all.

  • I know this will be unpopular and regardless of how the stupid cops handled it… but should this man, who can’t handle stressful situations, have been driving a car? There are all kinds of stressful situations when driving. Accidents, road work, other bad drivers, detours, etc.

  • Jerron Snead

    Prayers for this young man and his family. Being in the police and EMS world now for 34 years I have seen a lot of horrible things. AND learned a lot of things as well. One statement in the article seems to be possibly a learning point. It says: “When someone with autism is yelled at, or
    experiences bright lights, loud noise, and highly stressful situations,
    they tend to break down.”
    Meaning no offense whatsoever to this poor young man, perhaps if the statement is true….then perhaps those people do not need to be out in vehicles driving on city streets?
    Before you all start blasting me, think about this. They restrict some people with epilepsy, diabetes, and other medical conditions from driving. Why? Because they are a danger to themselves and other if they should have an exacerbation of their medical condition.
    So..that being said, if the “bright lights, loud noise, and highly stressful situations” can cause people with certain levels of autism to “break down”, do they really need to be out on the streets operating a vehicle that could kill them or other innocent people?
    Think about your drive to work, or how you get a bit nervous when an officer pulls you over, or an ambulance or firetruck comes up behind you needing you to vacate your lane. Everyone that drives faces the risk of having those “bright lights, loud noise, and highly stressful situations” when driving on the streets.
    Again, no offense intended to this unfortunate young man, but fleeing from an officer who pulls you over is a felony in most states. And I am sure that the vehicle nor this young man had anything on the car or himself that educated the police that he had autism. And of course that would be unpractical and unethical in my opinion. So perhaps it is the medical and drivers license system in Kansas that failed him and allowed him out on the streets to begin with, and not necessarily the total fault of the police. Obviously if the investigation determines that the actions of the police were not justified then I support their being punished under the justice system. But rarely is an incident on the streets totally the fault of the officers. Some blame has to go to the individual(s) that caused the interaction with the police in the first place.
    God bless the family and comfort them. Also comfort the officer who felt he had to pull the trigger as taking a life is NEVER an easy thing no matter the situation.

    • Lisa Boyd

      Or maybe the police need to take a couple of deep breaths before they start shooting. Not one of us is a perfect driver, and I would rather have met up with Joey on the road than most of the rest of the males in his age group in Ellis County. Cops included.

      • From the report, so far, Joey sounded like a nice, careful and cautious guy.
        And that is a whole lot better than most, neuro typical, folks.

  • Alan Castle

    This should not have happened. We do not need overzealous individuals wanting to put feathers in their cap Nazi style. Maybe the policeman is having a lot of difficulty with this too but he and the police department should have thought about that before. Hays is not LA or Chicago.

    • The police are supposed to be trained in the use of force. They did not understand is not much of an excuse. Use of force and especially deadly force is not a vague or ambiguous issue. The police, even if provoked, should only use deadly force when there is no other alternative.

      The police involved need to be tried for murder. And if there was not justification for lethal force, held accountable.

  • It has been more than a week.
    Is there any more information on this case?
    Have the police released any statements?

  • ytuque

    Hopefully a BLM supporter will shoot that cop.

  • ContessaSharra

    Seems like now that police know that there seems to be no consequences, they just are onto shooting whomever!

  • Kuksha Winter

    The assumption is that the officers involved could discern the autism, without having talked to him, questioned him, etc. What was presented was a man running from the police, who could have been one of many criminals trying to “get away” and potentially harming, as far as the officers knew, innocents. This shooting sucks, it sucks bad. Perhaps better education and life skills training could be given to the autistic community, with other communities (deaf, etc), on appropriate behavior when approached by law enforcement – not everyone is familiar with disabilities, and law enforcement takes a unique position when doing their jobs that a social worker, doctor, or specialist does not take. Quit knocking the police as if failure to be psychic is grounds for a public flogging.

  • watcherofolde

    If he was so susceptible to loud noises, shouts, etc, it is hard to believe he would have been given a driver’s licence. I have seen autistic kids go into an absolute panic during a fire alarm, so much so, that they got early notice and release. Even a loudly crying baby–it just depends on what type of autism they have. I’m so sorry this happened, but cops do NOT wake up in the morning, thinking about who they will kill today.

  • Dorene Harwood

    thats the thing they dont care. im suffering my own ordeal with hays pd as a civilian here. not all are bad but the majority of them are corrupt

  • It has been a few months. What is happening with the Joseph Weber story?
    If Webner was running away, did he get shot in the back?
    What is his story as to why he shot Webner?
    What about the back-up COP?
    What happened to the COP?
    And family?

  • James Latham

    This country is worried about ISIS when our thugs in blue continue to shoot down citizens in cold blood. Just because you don’t obey there commands is no reason to shoot someone dead. Cops need to be tested for steroid use and other drugs.

  • Elsie

    The autistic man was driving a car??? OMG.
    I’ ve seen and heard a lot of autistic temper tantrums and meltdowns, often with very aggressive behavior.
    When this was the case it’s understood.

  • Nanette Valencia

    So, they’re just going to get away with killing an unarmed man?