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Dallas Cop Watched as Woman’s Kids Taken at Gunpoint, Ignored Her Cries for Help, Drove Off

“[The gunman] jerked my son out the car. That policeman drove off. He drove off. He didn’t come back.”

Dallas, TX — A Dallas police officer is on administrative leave and could actually be fired for ignoring the pleas of a mother whose children were kidnapped at gunpoint.

Two weeks ago, Miesha Kilson was being chased down by a crazed maniac with a gun, Steven Douglas. During the chase Kilson hit a curb which left her vehicle disabled. Douglas then came over to Kilson’s vehicle and proceeded to kidnap her children at gun point.

“He reached into the windows, pulls it out,” said Kilson. “And as the window exploded in my face, I actually thought he shot it; I didn’t know at the time. But I did see his hands up and he pulled [the window] out. And I looked over, and as I looked up out that passenger window, I swear I saw an angel ‘cause I saw a police car right at my car.”

In that police car was 28-year veteran of the Dallas PD, Cpl. Les Richardson. Richardson watched the frantic Kilson begging him for help as her kids were being pulled out of the vehicle by a madman.

“That man [Richardson] looked up, he said, ‘What’s going on?’” said Kilson. “Right at my window, directly. I said, ‘Get him, get him!’ As [Douglas] got the gun, Maya said, ‘Get out, get out!’ [Douglas] saw the policeman, so he moved the gun. He jerked my son out the car. That policeman drove off. He drove off. He didn’t come back.”

After a chase involving other police officers, Douglas was eventually stopped and killed as he attempted to fire on police.

Disciplinary hearings were held Thursday in which Dallas police commanders recommended that Officer Les Richardson be terminated by Chief David Brown. It’s now up to Brown whether to fire Richardson or not.

The four allegations against Richardson are: dereliction of duty, improper comments, failure to immediately clear upon the completion of a call and use of tobacco products in a city vehicle.

These actions, or rather, inaction, by Richardson have set a new low in police misconduct.

The idea that police protect you is a misconception as they will seldom prevent violence. They normally show up after the violence or crime has been committed and then try and find a culprit, or in this case, they just ignore the crime taking place and leave.

The average response time to a 9-1-1 call is 10 minutes nationwide. In some cases the dispatchers do not even take the caller seriously and the victim ends up dead, when a crime could have actually been prevented.

The reality is that police act as revenue collectors for the state and are there to enforce the law only.

They most assuredly do not “protect and serve.”
Richardson may very well stay on the force despite his dereliction, as the Supreme Court ruled that the police do not owe a specific duty to provide police services to individuals based on the public duty doctrine. In other words, police do not have a constitutional duty to protect a person from harm.