narcan

Butler County, OH — An Ohio sheriff is making national headlines this week after publicly noting that his department will be one of the only ones in the state to refuse to carry Narcan, a drug used to reverse the effects of opioid and heroin overdoses.

According to Cincinatti.com, Butler County Sheriff Richard K. Jones says his deputies won’t carry Narcan, despite its effectiveness reversing the effects of opioid and heroin overdoses. He’s the only sheriff in Southwest Ohio refusing to carry the life-saving medicine.

The sheriff made this reckless decision in spite of the fact that drug overdoses continue to be the leading cause of death in the entire county. According to the coroner, the county is now on track to break last year’s record for the highest number of overdose deaths.

“The disturbing trend of overdose deaths involving fentanyl in Butler County continues at an alarming rate,” said Butler County Coroner Lisa Mannix in a recent press conference.

Jones’ reasoning for refusing to revive overdosed individuals with Narcan is not surprising — officer safety.

According to Jones, when deputies save the life of someone during an overdose, they often wake up, see the deputies, and freak out.

“I don’t do Narcan,” Jones told reporter Keith BieryGolick.

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As FOX 19 reports, Jones’ remarks Thursday come after a Middletown city councilman recently brought national attention to that Butler County city by suggesting letting addicts die instead of repeatedly reviving them with Narcan.

The suggestion to let addicts die from their overdose brings into question the responsibility of the state to protect people from themselves.

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Jones and his deputies will undoubtedly pull over hundreds of people this year and issue them citations for not wearing their seat belts. This extortion will be carried out in the name of public safety and protecting people from themselves.

The sheriff refusing to protect people from their heroin overdoses highlights the hypocrisy in seat belt tickets as well as other citations, arrests, and detainment for victimless crimes that the sheriff is more than happy to enforce.

Also, what if the sheriff and his deputies found a child who accidentally overdosed on their parent’s opioid supply? How would they feel knowing they could’ve saved the life of an innocent child if they would’ve simply carried Narcan?

Also, the question still remains: Does the state have a legal responsibility to save your life with Narcan if you overdose on opioids?

Being that the sheriff is funded by the very people who may experience an overdose one day, the answer to that question is most likely yes. The citizens of Butler are forced to pay for the sheriff’s department, therefore the sheriff owes them a service in return.

However, where is the line drawn? Should police simply continue to go on calls and revive people over and over with Narcan that can cost up to $75 per dose?

To understand the answers to those questions, we have to look at how the state has essentially created and facilitated the current opioid epidemic in which America currently finds itself.

For decades, the US government has waged a war on drugs while granting the monopoly on opioid production to the pharmaceutical industry. For years, people who would’ve never thought of trying heroin trusted their doctors who were being paid large sums of money to prescribe them dangerous and addictive opioids. 

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As the crack down on opioids came to a head, all the ‘legal’ drug addicts were forced into the black market to continue supporting their addictions. Soccer moms and business professionals alike quickly found themselves buying highly dangerous fentanyl and heroin on the black market to support their government-approved pharmaceutical industry-sustained addictions.

Instead of helping these people, who clearly have physical and mental addictions and need help, the government simply began locking them in cages when they caught them with it.

Research — according to many law enforcement officials — shows that the cost of incarceration, especially for repeat drug offenders, is far higher than simply treating their addiction.

The good news is that people like Jones are quickly finding themselves obsolete. Law enforcement across the country are realizing that treatment — not cages — curbs the problem of addiction far more successfully.

This realization has led to the creation of the Angel Program.

As the Boston Globe reports:

“As Gloucester police chief, Leonard Campanello pledged in 2015 that drug users could walk into the police station, hand over heroin, and walk out into treatment within hours — without arrest or charges. The concept of help rather than handcuffs became a national sensation.

Campanello is no longer police chief there, but the program is continuing in Gloucester. The concept of helping addicts instead of criminalizing them is such a success, it’s been adopted by 200 police agencies in 28 states.

Aside from the angel program, stopping the war on drugs is also having a heavy effect on reducing opioid overdoses.

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As TFTP has reported at length, states with legal cannabis see far fewer overdoses than those who cage people for the plant.

Solutions to this epidemic exist, but in order for them to be successful, government must legalize freedom and admit that the war on drugs is an epic failure. While things may seem bleak, these tiny changes are already beginning to have a major positive effect.

Soon enough, the dinosaurs who continue to push the drug war will be seen as the tyrants they are. To all those in law enforcement, you will do well to place yourself on the right side of history — which, most assuredly, does not involve kidnapping, caging, and killing people in a failed war to control what those people do with their own bodies.

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Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Facebook.
  • David Daisy May Boldock

    Such an empathetic man. More like a pathetic excuse for a man.

    • Amor Terra

      Which fully explains his choice in careers.

      • David Daisy May Boldock

        You have that in a nutshell mate.
        Just looking at his sour grizzled face speaks volumes.

        • We are Anonymiss

          His deputies should be required to carry a picture of his face. One look at that will shock the ODer right out of his OD!

          • David Daisy May Boldock

            Ideally put it behind their shit house doors for when they are constipated haha

  • Damiana

    For every overdose death under that power trip he calls “his watch,” he needs to be charged with negligent homicide because that’s what this is. Cops aren’t legally allowed to just stand around and let someone die when they can be saved – no matter HOW much you might hate “the junkies.”

    • James Bird

      Wrong. If you have not been trained to admiister narcan and do not have it there is nothing an officer can do until cpr is necessary. Cpr is rarely effective. I would think responsibility on the overdoser would be more effective, like don’t take drugs known to cause death… js

      • IceTrey

        I think the directions are on the injector.

        • Amor Terra

          Yes, they are. Kits are even available for home use. But dickbrain there might be right. The cops would have to be able to read to use them.

          • We are Anonymiss

            We know of a cardiac arrest case where the paramedics came and had to stop to READ the instructions on how to use the defibrillator!

          • Bunny

            Amore – Lol.😂 @”dickbrain”
            Cops are shown how to administer it and because they have a new, much easier to use kind it’s pretty basic. Just like squirting nasal spay up the nose. No special connectors or anything.

      • Amor Terra

        You’re as big a prick as that cop–and I’ll bet I know your occupation, officer. Not everyone who overdoses on opioids is a junkie. Several years before he died, my 80 year old dad overdosed on hydrocodone after his idiot doctor started him on a Fentanyl patch in addition. The dose was just too strong. Fortunately, the police in our town at that time weren’t in need of the world’s largest proctologist, like you and the “sheriff.”

        BTW–my dad was an ex-cop.

        • We are Anonymiss

          We are sorry to hear about what happened to your dad.

          • Amor Terra

            Thank you. Unfortunately, he kept listening to the same idiot doctor until he killed him. And of course, they faked the death certificate–pneumonia, they called it.

          • demji

            I am so sorry to hear about your father. I know you’re both heartbroken and enraged. Unfortunately, there’s a lot of “Death by Idiot Doctor(s)” going around. A similar situation killed my sister 2 years ago. I hope you find peace.

          • Amor Terra

            Thank you. I have. My father made his choices. I told him he needed to stop listening to that doc and get off the meds. He let fear and despair take the last ten years of his life. Perhaps it was not all for naught. I certainly won’t make the same mistake. I plan to slide into home plate screaming, “I did it!” My sympathies for your loss as well.

        • David Daisy May Boldock

          He needs a team of proctologists lol

      • Jennifer Cummings

        What messed up in this county is sick people going to jail in instead of a hospital.

        It kills me as so many things are backwards in this country. People should be forced into rehab. It don’t have to be a super up scale rehab that will break the tax payers. Hell have a rehab run like a jail with stuff who treat dug addiction.

        The best thing a state can do is legalize marijuana.

        • Damiana

          Nah, I disagree. Just locking people into unqualified shit holes and calling it “treatment” is no more helpful than throwing them in jail… and you can bet it’d end up being FAR more expensive, simply because it’s “medical care” instead of “punishment.”

          • Karolyn

            No way! Jail just makes them worse. All rehabs should be strictly regulated, and I believe most states do that. However, I saw the story about the “sober houses” in Florida that are not regulated.

          • Damiana

            That’s pretty much what I’m saying, though I do appreciate you clarifying that jail is NOT the answer either. I just don’t think the “treatment industrial complex” is going to end up being ONE BIT better. Fucking with addicts is a profitable business, so lots of people with lots of money have a vested interest in NOT doing anything to actually help.

        • lauraroberts

          I do agree that marijuana needs to be legalized.

          • billdeserthills

            Actually since californy passed the compassionate care act it kinda has. The act allows clinics to send you marijuana without violating cali state laws as long as the exchange of $$ is called a donation.

      • Michael P.

        So, what if your son or daughter got addicted to drugs and was in this position. I’m sure your opinion and outlook would change, because you’d want them to save your own. Problem with our society today is too many people feel they are the exception or entitled to special treatment when the tables have turned.

        • lauraroberts

          Then the parents should carry narcan so they can save their child.

          • We are Anonymiss

            What? So, EVERYONE should walk around with some narcan so they can save someone from an overdose.

          • Jeremy Glasser

            Kinda reminds me of a little argument starter called “the second amendment”…

            Yes, we should – because you never know, and it’s better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it, and sort of like a gun, or a fire extinguisher, or any other tool that could essentially save your life, or someone else’s life… I see not argument against people who want to carry Narcan… in fact, rather than making the cops carry it, why not have it not cost $75, and give it to junkie programs so they can look out for each other and not have to worry about a cage… hmm… but what do I know, I’m just a crazy libertarian that believes in individual liberties, looking out for yourself, your family and friends, and maybe not allowing mortal injury to come to strangers either, if you have the power to prevent it…

            I’m sure Narcan is easier to carry than a cop… and probably easier to use correctly than a gun too, and with generally positive results by comparison, especially when the police are removed from the equation… but, I guess that applies to all of the above as well.

          • We are Anonymiss

            But, $75 a pop can become really expensive for people who are low income. We don’t carry it…and would never have had a reason to use it if we had it with us.

          • Bunny

            Jeremy – Just a little FYI; they DO give it free in “junkie programs” as you call it.

          • moodswing916

            Everyone that lives with an addict they want to live should.

          • Terese67

            You’ve been on a mood swing ever since you started posting. Very narrow minded. I’m assuming the majority of the time. I’m ashamed of people like you.

          • Bunny

            No, but every officer and emt should!

          • moodswing916

            They, I’m in Ohio and there are ads on the radio for it.

          • Bunny

            Laura Roberts – Stupid answer. Who do people call in emergencies, the person’s parents????

      • Michael P.

        Furthermore, if police are just to enforce laws, drawing samples of blood to check blood alcohol level when a driver is suspected of drunk driving should be banned, too. Or, let’s pay even more tax money to have a licensed phlebotomist ride along to draw the blood. A life is a life, and taking a chance at saving someone could mean a wake up call for them to get help. Don’t be so self-righteous.

        • lauraroberts

          Cops don’t draw blood, they take the suspect to the hospital and it’s done there.

          • Bunny

            Laura – Exactly, but the point is they are doing it.

      • Last name rhymes with exactly what you are, mean spirited excrement!

      • We are Anonymiss

        Cops have so much training already, adding a 5 minute course on how to do Narcan isn’t that much more. So, every overdose is a “criminal who deserved what happened to him”? End result: You are a copsucker.

      • Karolyn

        Well, golly gee, Sherlock! If all the money that went into the drug ware was used more wisely, we wouldn’t have so many druggies. Education and rehab are the only answers. Of course, the REAL answer is a kinder, gentler world, because the cause of addiction is disconnection from community – the lack of human contact and activity..

        • Amor Terra

          Well, judging by many of the comments on this article, it’s hard to imagine someone wanting to disconnect. Who wouldn’t want to just throw a party and have over James Bird and his kind of judgmental, sociopathic arseholes?

          • Damiana

            Every one of whom would be slamming back whiskey shooters and talking about what degenerate scum “druggies” are. The irony would be lost on them entirely!

      • Andrea Arocho

        Shit where I live narcan is over the counter and most addicts have there own smdh.

  • Damiana

    Law enforcement across the country are realizing that treatment — not cages — curbs the problem of addiction far more successfully.

    No, they’re not! They knew this all along and didn’t care. They’re just stymied because so many of their recent arrests have been white, well-to-do people and THIS CANNOT BE. Let a black person get caught with some crack and you’ll see PROOF that they didn’t “realize” a thing and are merely making an exception for rich white people.

    • billdeserthills

      Oregon is trying to pass a law to decriminalize cocaine,heroin, e &meth, the only catch is the offender can’t have any felony priors and under 2 prior drug offenses–I’m not sure just who it is supposed to help?

      • We are Anonymiss

        SECTION 9. ORS 475.752, as amended by section 59, chapter 24, Oregon Laws 2016, and section
        26, chapter 21, Oregon Laws 2017 (Enrolled Senate Bill 302), is amended to read:
        475.752. (1) Except as authorized by ORS 475.005 to 475.285 and 475.752 to 475.980, it is unlawful
        for any person to manufacture or deliver a controlled substance. Any person who violates this subsection
        with respect to:
        (a) A controlled substance in Schedule I, is guilty of a Class A felony, except as otherwise provided
        in ORS 475.886 and 475.890.
        (b) A controlled substance in Schedule II, is guilty of a Class B felony, except as otherwise
        provided in ORS 475.878, 475.880, 475.882, 475.904 and 475.906.
        (c) A controlled substance in Schedule III, is guilty of a Class C felony, except as otherwise
        provided in ORS 475.904 and 475.906.
        (d) A controlled substance in Schedule IV, is guilty of a Class B misdemeanor.
        (e) A controlled substance in Schedule V, is guilty of a Class C misdemeanor.
        (2) Except as authorized in ORS 475.005 to 475.285 and 475.752 to 475.980, it is unlawful for any
        person to create or deliver a counterfeit substance. Any person who violates this subsection with
        respect to:
        (a) A counterfeit substance in Schedule I, is guilty of a Class A felony.
        (b) A counterfeit substance in Schedule II, is guilty of a Class B felony.
        (c) A counterfeit substance in Schedule III, is guilty of a Class C felony.
        (d) A counterfeit substance in Schedule IV, is guilty of a Class B misdemeanor.
        (e) A counterfeit substance in Schedule V, is guilty of a Class C misdemeanor.
        (3) It is unlawful for any person knowingly or intentionally to possess a controlled substance
        unless the substance was obtained directly from, or pursuant to a valid prescription or order of, a
        practitioner while acting in the course of professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized
        by ORS 475.005 to 475.285 and 475.752 to 475.980. Any person who violates this subsection with respect
        to:
        (a) A controlled substance in Schedule I, is guilty of a Class [B felony] A misdemeanor, except
        as otherwise provided in ORS 475.854, 475.874 and 475.894 and subsection (7) of this section.
        (b) A controlled substance in Schedule II, is guilty of a Class [C felony] A misdemeanor, except
        as otherwise provided in ORS 475.824, 475.834 or 475.884 or subsection (8) of this section.
        (c) A controlled substance in Schedule III, is guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.
        (d) A controlled substance in Schedule IV, is guilty of a Class C misdemeanor.
        (e) A controlled substance in Schedule V, is guilty of a violation.
        (4) In any prosecution under this section for manufacture, possession or delivery of that plant
        of the genus Lophophora commonly known as peyote, it is an affirmative defense that the peyote is
        being used or is intended for use:
        (a) In connection with the good faith practice of a religious belief;
        (b) As directly associated with a religious practice; and
        (c) In a manner that is not dangerous to the health of the user or others who are in the proximity
        of the user.
        (5) The affirmative defense created in subsection (4) of this section is not available to any person
        who has possessed or delivered the peyote while incarcerated in a correctional facility in this state.
        (6)(a) Notwithstanding subsection (1) of this section, a person who unlawfully manufactures or
        delivers a controlled substance in Schedule IV and who thereby causes death to another person is
        guilty of a Class C felony.
        (b) For purposes of this subsection, causation is established when the controlled substance plays
        a substantial role in the death of the other person.(7) Notwithstanding subsection (3)(a) of this section, unlawful possession of a controlled
        substance in Schedule I is a Class B felony if:
        (a) The person possesses a usable quantity of the controlled substance and:
        (A) At the time of the possession, the person has a prior felony conviction;
        (B) At the time of the possession, the person has two or more prior convictions for unlawful
        possession of a usable quantity of a controlled substance; or
        (C) The possession is a commercial drug offense under ORS 475.900 (1)(b); or
        (b) The person possesses:
        (A) Forty or more user units of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount
        of lysergic acid diethylamide; or
        (B) Twelve grams or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of
        psilocybin or psilocin.
        (8) Notwithstanding subsection (3)(b) of this section, unlawful possession of a controlled
        substance in Schedule II is a Class C felony if the person possesses a usable quantity of the
        controlled substance and:
        (a) At the time of the possession, the person has a prior felony conviction;
        (b) At the time of the possession, the person has two or more prior convictions for unlawful
        possession of a usable quantity of a controlled substance; or
        (c) The possession is a commercial drug offense under ORS 475.900 (1)(b).

        “(a) A controlled substance in Schedule I, is guilty of a Class A felony, except as otherwise provided” Schedule 1 drugs includes marihuana, heroin,

        (b) A controlled substance in Schedule II, is guilty of a Class B felony, except as otherwise
        provided in ORS 475.878, 475.880, 475.882, 475.904 and 475.906.
        Schedule 2 drugs include Cocaine, Methamphetamine.

        No decriminalization here!

  • John C Carleton

    I believe in individual liberty. That includes the right to kill ones self, however they chose to.
    I do not support other people having their labor robbed out of the mouths of their hungry children, to cuttle and save self destructive people.

    • Damiana

      …until someone YOU love is lying on the floor needing “their labor.” At that time, you’ll either prove yourself to be a TOTAL HYPOCRITE or a MONSTROUS PSYCHOPATH. So, which are you going to be when someone YOU care about falls victim to their own self-destructive habits? C’mon… we all have at least one!

      Oh, and also… fuck you.

    • G’ma G

      In my past work I saw quite a few people with self-destructive behaviors get themselves onto a positive track. It’s important that we remember not everyone has the same skills and abilities to do things the way we think they should. It takes some of us longer than others to get our shit together–most especially when we come from deprived or dysfunctional backgrounds. We live in a very complex and stressful society.

      • John C Carleton

        No one should be forced to pay for another mistakes. Everyone has a right to fry their brains on anything they want, but not force someone else to pay for keeping them alive.

        • Damiana

          Don’t worry – Karma will remember what you said the next time you make a mistake. Good luck – I’ve heard she can be a real bitch sometimes!

          • John C Carleton
          • billdeserthills

            I’m jewish and I don’t like this zionism
            seems like a bunch of leftist crap

          • John C Carleton

            Left-right, same bird.
            Zionism is just evil dressed up in religions. Just criminals using whatever symbol their brand of religion is, to wrap their personal evil in to make it be except able to society. Some really believe the your special because god chose you, so you can do anything to anyone at any time, others don’t believe a word of it, but it gives the cover to do the evil they like doing.

          • billdeserthills

            So many sick twisted people out there who need approval of some sort seem to need religion to crap on each other

          • John C Carleton

            “With or without religion, good people can behave well, and bad people can do evil; but for good people to do evil-that takes religion.”-Steven Weeinberg

          • billdeserthills

            Religion, or becoming a police officer–
            Of course we all know if there was such a thing as a ‘good’ cop, they would have taken care of the ‘bad’ cops a long time ago.

          • lawmanjed

            It takes religion for good people to do evil? How incredibly naive. All those Germans sure fell in line with Hitler, no religion there except state-worship and self-worship. Same with Communism. Which are you Johnny?

          • John C Carleton

            Here IT.
            Zionism is a religion. Thats why the Zionist judaic crime cabal cult is holocustiong the Palestinians people.
            Thats why they shoot pregnant women in the belly, right through the child, them wear T shirts bragging, One shot , Two Kills.
            YEP. Some of those buck toothed inbred frothing at the mouth baby raping murderers HAD to have been human before the zionist virus took control, so yes.

          • lawmanjed

            “So many sick twisted people out there who need approval of some sort seem to need religion to crap on each other.”

            Look in the mirror that is exactly what you’re doing, nobody was discussing religion until John C Nazi-boy brought it up.

          • billdeserthills

            I’m sorry my reply has upset you, sometimes I am very high when I respond on here, and perhaps what I say means little or nothing to you at those times. I will of course be only too glad to explain how the block user fuction is engaged, or you can always feel free to simply follow E-bay rules & stfu

            Thank you for your support

          • lawmanjed

            You fucking moron Zionism is about the Jewish people returning to their ancient ancestral biblical homeland Israel, and that has been fulfilled. You have no fucking clue about anything you Nazi scum bag.

          • John C Carleton

            Having a bad day i see. The light of truth has made you squirm like a blood sucking leech having salt poured on it.
            How the light of truth burns your evil!

          • lawmanjed

            Do you even know what Zionism is? I guarantee if you ask John C Carlton to define what Zionism is he wont do it, he hates Jews. You can’t be a very good Jew if you don’t think Israel is the promised land of our people. Maybe you think the Arabs should’ve just driven the Jews into the sea, or the Jews should have stayed in anti-Semitic post-Nazi Europe? USA and most of Europe refused entry for holocaust refugees, but brought in the Nazi brain-trust via Project Paperclip, unlike the Muslims they are bringing in in droves now. Seriously, wake up.

          • billdeserthills

            Trust me when I say that as soon a John C says something that annoys me too far he will immediately be added to the hundreds of others who I have done a ‘block user’ on.

            Anyway I will continue to believe that Israel has been promised to the Jews, through both religious text and the Balfour Declaration. I am no lover of zionists, their beliefs are counter to religious law and therefore cannot be correct.
            Whether I am good or bad I am a jew, Believe it or Not–
            I’m not wearing this star for my health

        • Amor Terra

          So, I guess there should be no response to a one-car accident–right? Just let them sit there on the side of the road and bleed out.

          • John C Carleton

            Are you truly ignorant? The discussion is about druggies overdosing and dying. Where in the world in your brain did you equate that with a car wreck.
            OR do you understand how stupid that is, but this is your clumsy way of trying to win make your point, which is very cloudy at the moment.

          • Amor Terra

            Small course in logic, 100 level. You said no one should pay for another’s mistakes. A one car accident can really only be due to the mistake of the driver–as minor as overcorrecting to avoid an animal or tuning the radio and missing a curve up to possible drug/alcohol intoxication. Emergency response costs money, which we pay for, even if the driver can’t or doesn’t pay. Therefore, we’d be paying for someone else’s mistake. It’s really not that hard, if you have 2 functioning brain cells.

          • John C Carleton

            I am quite secure in my believes, If you want to financially take care of destructive people, pull your money out of your pocket and do so, no one said you could not. But don’t try to Israel my pocket book for YOUR hang ups.

          • Amor Terra

            It’s $75 a dose. It’s hardly “financially taking care” of destructive people. If you hate narcan, you must really hate drug laws–a year in prison for having a couple doobies is sucking $50k down the tubes, while vitually ensuring that the person can’t be employed at anything better than minimum wage when they get out.

            And I’m sure you are quite secure in your beliefs–assholes usually are. Hopefully your bag of cold hard cash will comfort you on your deathbed. If you treat people in your life the way you sound, that may well be all you have.

          • John C Carleton

            Arguing with oneself is the last resort of a control freak.

          • Amor Terra

            I think I was arguing with you.

          • John C Carleton

            No, you were auguring with yourself. Told you i was not interested but you kept babbling on, i was not reading. You were arguing with yourself as you are trying to force your drivel on me.

          • Amor Terra

            Then so long, and may you get exactly what you give.

          • We are Anonymiss

            So why do you keep arguing with yourself?

          • We are Anonymiss

            You said that no one should be forced to pay for another mistakes.

        • We are Anonymiss

          A girl marries a guy she knows is abusive. We shouldn’t waste taxpayer money prosecuting him for beating on her or killing her since she married an abuser, right?

        • lawmanjed

          Cops are paid government servants, they aren’t being forced to do anything.

    • We are Anonymiss

      Yeah, let’s just let people who accidently overdose die, right? While we are at it, let’s not lift a finger to help someone who got into a big traffic collision. They did it to themselves, so why bother helping?

    • lawmanjed

      I also believe in individual liberty. Do you not believe in paramedics, emergency services, love-thy-neighbor? If you don’t believe that cops and/or emergency services should provide this, along with other life-saving services, why support government services like this at all? What happened to protect and serve?

  • Damiana

    This is NOT a “safety” issue. This is a “hurry up and die, junkies” policy. Paramedics and firefighters put themselves “at risk” on every overdose call, so why can’t police? Besides, most junkies who just overdosed are weak and disoriented, feeling sicker than they’ve ever been in their lives. The feeble degree of “fight” that could be mustered by an overdose patient is ZERO excuse for anyone to just stand there and let them die, much less cops that are supposed to KNOW how to deal with any degree of violence.

    This notion that they’re suddenly going to “snap out of it” and go on some kind of superhuman PCP bender is just a bald-face lie intended to make the ignorant OK with this policy. An opiate overdose is a VERY debilitating experience and the people he’s casually murdering with inaction pose no more “threat” to his deputies than a basket of angry kittens.

    • Amor Terra

      “Paramedics and firefighters put themselves “at risk” on every overdose
      call, so why can’t police?”

      Because they’re cowards, and they’re afraid they might break a nail.

      • Damiana

        Sounds about right.

      • James Bird

        Police enforce laws not administer medicine. They deal with crime. If you feel so strongly about it buy some narcan and listen to a scanner all night and respond to the overdose calls. No one will prevent you from helping…

        • Amor Terra

          Police have basic medical emergency training, and many many law enforcement agencies use the Naloxone kits. This prick just doesn’t want to do what thousands of police do because he’s an asshole and apparently a coward. And if the number of untested rape kits and other unsolved cases is any indication, they don’t deal very well with crime either.

        • IceTrey

          I’ll bet you $100 if you show up at an overdose with Narcan the cops will prevent you from using it.

          • Amor Terra

            Or getting within 100 yards.

        • Jennifer Cummings

          I feel so strongly about it 2 years ago when a cop wrecked his car and landed on the roof I watched him die before I called it in. Not only did I watch it I lived steamed it to YouTube. It took half an hour for him to die. He begged me to get help as he bleed out on a back county road. It was quite funny as all cops in the shitty town wanted to arrest me for his death. Guess your point cops don’t have to help and neither do I.

          Maybe I tell you about a time I watched 2 guys beat the piss out of a cop. I could have jumped in and stopped them but I was enjoying the show.

          • Damiana

            Yeah, that’s actually not OK.

          • Finnur Juliusson

            Thank God you are not a cop, but you sure as hell have the ethics of a crooked cop.

          • Jennifer Cummings

            Really? Cops started a war on the American people. Way before I watched that cop die I was an actvist. The cops in town including the one who died would fuck with me every chance that got. If they seen me cross the road that would write me a jaywalking ticket and arrest me for failure to ID and refusal to sign the ticket. Luckily I always had a body cam and it was always on.

            So had the bad cops not did all this and the good cops turned a blind eye I would helped the cop who died:

          • Karolyn

            Wow! You are some cold cookie.

          • Jennifer Cummings

            Have you ever seen or heard of a cop beating the shit out of a person for the lowest level of crimes (if you will), offensive, civil infractions, and or victimless behavior.

            Well I have. Not only that cops are not trained in the law nor do many of them under stand the law.

            I’ll choose a very low level civil infraction to make my point. I’ve seen at least 6 times this month cops beat the shit out of people accusing them of jaywalking. The biggest issue is that many cops think crossing the street anywhere besides a marked cross walk is a crime. The law is different from state to state. In my state I will strap on a body cam and cross the street outside of the crosswalk to see how the cops will react. I’m allowed legally to cross the street outside a cross walk; at an intersection marked or unmarked, anywhere on a street where a marked crosswalks exist at both intersection, if a marked crosswalk is not within 4 blocks of where I’m attempting to cross.

            I go around educating cops on jaywalking by fighting tickets in court. I’ve been ticket 128 in 3 years and arrested for jaywalking 10 times. All of them I was found not guilty.

            This just proves these cops don’t know the simplest of the laws.

            Then you have cops stealing money from people over victimless behaviors or crimes if you will. Grown adults fined and arrested for not wearing a seatbelt while 90% of police pigs death are for failure to wearing a seatbelt. I’ve seen people be arrested and beat for their safety over a seatbelt ticket when they refused to sign the ticket.

            I’ve have seen cops arrest cancers patients son beat their cancer with marijuana but it didn’t matter to the cops they will arrests best and cage these people over a plant.

            Cops have and will continue to arrest people for feeding the homeless. Yep and beat the shit out of anyone who don’t think they should be arrested for feeding the homeless.

            Cops have used anti camping laws to steal tents, blankets and even food from the homeless. All these when they have no place to go.

            I’ve seen video of cops breaking down the door of an 87 year old woman who had a 21 year old warrant for her arrest for not wearing a searbelt. This woman called 911 to tell them 3 black guys were trying to break into her house. Well they showed up and arrested these black guys. When they got the old lady’s name they ran it for what ever reason. They find this 21 year old warrant for failure to pay a $15 seat belt ticket. Well the old lady herd more banging at the door and called 911. She was told it was the cops but we all know how cops bang on a door. So she was scared but that didn’t stop these monsters they wanted to put her in jail as to get her to pay that $15 fine. They called in the swat team knocked her down them tackled her to the ground breaking her hip. She sat in jail crying and begging for medical help and denied her meds she was on. The nurses at jails are some of the worst in the worst. She sat in jail for 3 days until Monday rolled around when a grand kid came buy and noticed her door off the hinges and her house empty of an property. The 3 blacks guys were released on ball with in an hour but she had to wait and see a judge on Monday before being released. Them 3 black guys came back and cleared out her house of everything she owned. The cops never tried to secure her home after breaking in. She was taking to the ER and stayed in the hospital for a month before going to a nursing home where she would die serval years later from complications related to the broken hip. She lost her independence and her freedom and everything she owned over a $15 warrant.

            Don’t make me start with with the countless bad cops and the good cops that lie and cover for them. Lawuan McDoland murdered by Jason Van Dyke. All the cops that lied and took part in the cover up declared war in the American people a long time ago when they decide they would do what ever to protect the thin blue line.

          • Karolyn

            I’ve not seen any of this kind of abuse other than stories online. You must live in the city. I’m a country mouse, and the cops around here seem to be pretty upstanding, for the most part. I can understand your perspective; but I also like to try and understand the cops’ perspective. Of course, there is absolutely no call for cops acting like you illustrated. I know it goes on, but I still have to maintain that they are not all bad. The bad thing is that the bad ones get away with it so often. I hope that old lady got compensated or sued them.

          • David Daisy May Boldock

            Surprised you did not sell tickets for the events.

          • Jennifer Cummings

            I posted it on YouTube until cops compiled about privacy issue so much the video was pulled down then after sometime YT banned the account. The video was on an old iPhone at this point and been sold in order to buy another one. So the video is gone. I wish I still had it.

          • Amor Terra

            Sorry, but being as big a psychopath as they are fixes nothing. As Ghandi is credited with saying, “An eye for an eye leaves everyone blind.” I’m the biggest hater of dirty cops there is, but I’ll be damned if if I let that turn me into scum like them.

          • Jennifer Cummings

            Fuck ghandi and fuck you.

            Letting your enemy blind you and walk way allows him to blind others.

          • Amor Terra

            But you aren’t doing anything to stop them. All you’re doing–according to you– is standing around acting like a psychopath, taking enjoyment in someone’s pain. You’ve got serious issues, lady. And BTW Fuck You Too.

          • Jennifer Cummings

            Im doing nothing? I advocate for medical marijuana knowing it is the cure for the opioid epidemic. So fuck you and eat my pussy.

          • Amor Terra

            No thanks. It’s probably been some pretty awful places.

        • We are Anonymiss

          Wait…so police are not trained on CPR? What does CPR have to do with enforcing laws? They are trained to give basic first aid. What does basic first aid have to do with enforcing laws?

      • crazytrain2

        Just stop. I don’t agree with this goof of a sheriff, or his excuse. But I have been on several calls this week alone that would make most buttholes pucker, so quit with the coward bs.

        • Amor Terra

          Sir, perhaps you are not of the ilk that would shoot a man dead for holding a 5 gallon bucket in his own garage and claim you feared for your life. Perhaps you are not of the ilk that would shoot a boy in the back and then lie about it and claim he was charging you. Perhaps you are not of the ilk that would slam a 100 lb. 14 year old to the pavement so hard that it made her a vegetable, over a misbehavior at school. And perhaps you are not of the ilk that would refuse to carry a simple to administer lifesaving drug because you’re afraid that a just overdosed junkie is too much for you to handle. If you are not, I congratulate you–you’re bucking a disturbing trend. But people like those I just described are cowards. And I will not apologize or back down from describing them as such.

          • crazytrain2

            I call them and their ilk the same.

        • We are Anonymiss

          Not ALL cops are like this goof. Not ALL cops are bad. We actually know some that are really decent, upstanding people. However, there are also TOO MANY who aren’t…or at least look the other way when their buddies do wrong.

          • crazytrain2

            I have never been one to look the other way, but then I have never really been around too much abusive behavior. Only a few times in 15 years. I have been around some officers that say things that I could never fathom saying, but I honestly have not witnessed too much abusive behavior. I want to say that my department is free of those sort of officers, but i am not that naive. What I do believe is that the officers that do abusive shit don’t do it around other officers, or rather they only do it around officers that share their opinions in the treatment of suspects.

          • We are Anonymiss

            We don’t know what department you are at Crazytrain. But, we deal with a number of corrupt departments. The code of silence at these departments is VERY strong.

          • crazytrain2

            In my experience, when a cop does something bad, and there is evidence of that, they flee away from that officer like rats fleeing from a sinking ship.

          • We are Anonymiss

            Again, we don’t know where you are. Your department really MUST be one of the better ones. We are not condeming all cops as bad.

            However, some departments really don’t do much. Blair V Pomona exceprts:

            “On April 9, 1995, Blair had a conversation while on duty with Michael Olivieri of the Department’s Major Crimes Task Force (MCTF). Blair asked him, “How’s the Task Force going?” Olivieri answered, “You don’t even want to know.” Blair said, “Like what?” Olivieri replied,”It’s not just stealing money” and went on to fill Blair in on misdeeds he had witnessed that had been performed by fellow officers on the MCTF. The misdeeds included not only leaving early and drinking on duty but actual crimes including stealing money, throwing a couch upon a suspect while executing a search warrant, and, most shameful of all, taking heroin from one suspect and planting it on another — “stuff like that,” as Olivieri blandly puts it in his deposition. Olivieri cautioned Blair that all of it was to be kept confidential: “Don’t breathe this to anybody.””

            “One week after Blair and Olivieri had reported the misdeeds, Blair found “rat” scrawled in pencil on his police locker. Two days later he found “asshole” written on the locker. Within the week three officers turned their backs on Blair as hewalked down the center hallway of the first floor of the offices of the Department. He experienced this treatment again and then again. He next found a big green glob of spittle on his locker. The phenomenon was reported three or four times. About a week later he found his police locker wired shut with a coat hanger; Olivieri’s locker had been similarly shut. Blair now reported the other locker incidents and the most recent one to Captain Romero and Sergeant Valdez.”

            “In June 1995 Blair, while on patrol, saw four men apparently engaged in criminal activity. He called for backup. None came. After 23 minutes he decided that no assistance was coming and gave up the thought of making an arrest. He reported the incident the next day to Lieutenant Watts and Sergeant Valdez. Nothing was done to the two officers supposedly assigned to him as backup.”

            The June 1995 incident was only one in a laundry list of continuing misdeeds by other officers.

            But, then, when a department has a culture of corruption, they tend to close ranks and actually lash out at the ones exposing them.

            https://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/770077/jed-arno-blair-v-city-of-pomona-a-municipal-corp-charles-heilman/

            “Later in July Blair was assigned to the MCTF. When he was advised of this transfer, Blair believed that “Sgt. Rogan was angry with [him] for encouraging Olivieri to go to the Chief with his concerns.” Blair then confronted Rogan, asking him if Rogan wanted to work with him and offering to decline the new assignment if Rogan so wished. Rogan indicated that he still considered the disciplined officers to be his friends and that there was too much “gray area” with Blair. Rogan refused to make a commitment to work with Blair.”

            Rogan was angry at Blair for causing “his friends” to be disciplined.

          • crazytrain2

            That is really messed up. I have one officer that is always talking about “rats.” I looked at him in front of the whole shift and said “if you ever kicked a suspect in the mouth while handcuffed, after I was done beating your ass, I would be on the phone with the chief, does that make me a rat?” He has not said much about our rodent problem as of late.

          • We are Anonymiss

            That is just par for the course in some departments. A couple of cops just beat the SHIT out of someone, nearly killing him, the department exonerates them. The DA said they had no probable cause, the department exonerates them anyway.

            Cop kills someone while driving down the street. He goes off the side of the road and runs someone down on a bicycle in the bike lane because he isn’t paying attention. He proceeds to LIE to the investigator. He tells the investigator that “the guy on the bike rode out into the street right in front of me!” (LUL! Explain how that is even possible when he hit the guy in the bike lane). The investigator determines that the officer did not hit the brakes until AFTER he ran the guy over. The investigator also determines that the officer lied about what happened. The officer is never charged with any crime, nor disciplined in any way!

            Recently, Leroy Baca was convicted of corruption. The case started with prosecution of lower level deputies and just climbed uphill.

            We don’t know if you remember the Rampart scandal or not. It made big news here when it broke.

          • crazytrain2

            Again, messed up. I find myself writing emails explaining why I hung up on someone that was calling me a “fucking asshole” repeatedly because I don’t want to get in trouble, even though I am the fourth highest rank in my entire department. Yet these shitbirds get away with that stuff.

          • We are Anonymiss

            Oh, we totally agree with you on that! Believe us, you WILL get NO argument from us!!! At least at your department, people are being held accountable when they do wrong.

          • Amor Terra

            You know, crazytrain, there are those of us who spend our time trying to expose and correct the problems in law enforcement. I do it because I lived with a cop for all my formative years, and I know, even an imperfect man like my father didn’t act like these thugs–you don’t have to be superman to act like a human being, even as a cop. If there were more decent cops who raised holy hell whenever one of these abuses comes to light (in or out of your department), I think the psychos would feel less at ease being psychos, and perhaps the psycho bosses would stop with the “let them resign and get another job 15 minutes later” revolving door.

            You can see from these forums that people have had enough. A few, like Jennifer Cummings upthread, have gone over the edge to psychopathic retaliatory behavior. And soon, abusive asshole cops will start to get decent people, like you seem to be, killed. It would behoove all the decent people who are cops to start speaking loud and clear truth to authority.

          • crazytrain2

            I would like to believe that I would be the rave one to do something if ever something serious happened in my presence. Luckily, aside from cooling a few officers, stepping in for them when things got heated, or pulling them back, I have never witnessed an overt abuse by an officer. The bad cops don’t do it in front of other cops, unless they are bad or silent. But the truly bad ones piss me off too. I am not talking about a bad shooting out of fear or a mistake, but truly evil shot like Abner Louima, who had a broomstick shoved where no broomstick has business going.

    • crazytrain2

      First, a basket of angry kittens can be dangerous. As I write this, I have two kittens on my lap. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/99064b4b682a2e0c029d3ed6122a010d0e454a31913a9e51962fd86ed4ec5002.jpg

      • crazytrain2

        Also, I can remember my first three overdose calls. The first was a cocaine od, the second was a guy that called for help because he had so many fentanyl patches on his body, that he was od’ing and was sweating profusely, and he called because he wanted help getting the patches to stay on. He had them stuck to his bald head, and was going into cardiac arrest and his breathing was labored. My third od call was a kid that was melting and injecting the fentanyl patch. He shot up, then collapsed against the bathroom door. His mom gave us permission to kick the door in, which sent him flying into the opposite wall. But he was in pretty bad shape and it did not even wake him up. This was the first time I ever saw, or even heard of narcan. So the firefighters have him a few doses of narcan, which brought him around almost instantly after the second dose. As soon as the kid opened his eyes, he started swinging at us. We had to restrain him, and while it was not the pcp strength,i remember being surprised by how strong he was. This was probably 12 years ago. Again, that was the first time I witnessed narcan being used. I have been to four calls this week where i watched it being administered. Only one was a violent reaction, but he was already restrained

        • Amor Terra

          Ah, there you go! Someone with a brain could handcuff the unconscious o.d. BEFORE administering the Narcan. Presto! Danger from flailing junkie greatly reduced. Now tell me–if you and your cohorts can figure this out and administer Narcan, how would YOU describe this callous, judgmental asshole who says his special little deputies can’t be bothered to save someone’s life?

          • Guy

            He and Jeff Sessions, could be cousins. That’s how.

          • We are Anonymiss

            You sure they could be cousins? Couldn’t they be blood brothers separated at birth?

          • Guy

            For sure I would not know, you would have to ask Jeff for the answer, but depending on if he is befor Congress or not, would tell you his answer, depending on if he feels like being on the 5th or not and if it’s a Tue or Wed, and certainly if that tie he happens to be wearing, is blue or red on that day ! If it’s blue, the color of his eyes, then you are fortunately, maybe or maybe not, will get a answer.

          • crazytrain2

            I think you just said it. A callous, judegmental asshole. I have actually handcuffed a few people before the administering of narcan. It seems to make them less cooperative, and it confuses them more. The violent responses are less common, it seems, than ten years ago. Maybe the drug has changed? They did not have the nasal spray back then, so maybe that is what has changed the response. We used to have to fight with people that had an iv line, which made everyone nervous, as you have blood and a needle+ junkie= bad situation.

            The worst was a crackwhore that od’d and was fighting us before the narcan. One of her breasts was flopping around as we tried to hold her down. The paramedic brought out a needle, and I said “are you insane? You want to put a needle in this thing, and expose us all to her blood! Have you ever seen alien? Her blood is probably worse than the alien queens!” She they did the nasal spray, but I kept screaming because her breast was on my forearm. I can still feel it, the weight of it, sweaty and nasty. Almost ruined boobs for me. Almost.

      • We are Anonymiss

        We have 4 feral cats that live in our house. 2 of them love the lap. All of them love us.

        • crazytrain2

          Again, as I write this, I have my girls in my lap. They don’t seem to care that they make it difficult to read a book, or type a response, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

          • We are Anonymiss

            Naw, they don’t care. They just want to hang out with you!!!

    • Jennifer Cummings

      Exactly plus if it’s that big of a deal which it seems officer safety is all they care about cuff the person then give them narcan.

      Officer safety means no one else gets to be safe.

    • Guy

      It’s really simple Cat, when you all stop and think about it. In reality it’s not at all about safety for his officers, but how much more easier if he just lets the person die. Nof effort = no cost or risk, then all he has to do is let the coroner scoop em into a body bag and, ZIPPED, problem goes away !

  • Damiana

    I wonder if it’s even occurred to this assclown that not all overdoses are caused by junkies who were junkin’ it up. A lot of overdoses are purely ACCIDENTAL in nature – kid got into mom’s pills, pharmacist/doctor made a prescribing error, literally forgot and took a second dose (happens a lot with old people), bad reaction to a brand new drug… and the list goes on – so I guess all those people are just “collateral damage” in this ONE nasty man’s hatred of drug addicts?

    • Abz B Zbas

      Preach on sister!

    • James Bird

      You’re incorrect. The overwhelming majority of overdoses are junkies. Don’t kid yourself. Contrary to the author of this highly opinionated story. The junkies rarely are paying their taxes. There is no law requiring the sheriff to administer narcan. However he is required to enforce traffic laws like seat belts and stop sign. Terribly written story based on zero facts.

      • Damiana
        • Amor Terra

          Nicely done, Cat.

        • James Lee

          lol

        • David Daisy May Boldock

          Same attitude as my ex, only with two fingers shown oppositely to Winston Churchill’s V sign haha

      • Amor Terra

        Yeah, there’s no law requiring cops to act like human beings–and it’s a damn good thing. There aren’t enough prisons to hold all the sub-human ones.

        • We are Anonymiss

          We have the biggest prison population in the world.

          • Amor Terra

            And growing every day. Everything’s illegal–unless you’re rich, a cop, or a politician.

      • IceTrey

        No, cops have discretion. They can give a warning for instance.

      • Jan Atle Ramsli

        Denouncing inhumanity seems to attract psychopaths like shit attracts flies.

        • Amor Terra

          It’s a shame it’s not a little more like a bug-zapper. ZZZZZZTTT!

      • We are Anonymiss

        What ever you say. Copsucker!

      • David Daisy May Boldock

        Good analogy that promote seat belts to save lives, but no Narcan to end lives.

      • Bunny

        James – Cops are here to do a duty. One of their main duties is protecting citizens. Whether the overdosing person pays taxes or not, the rest of us ARE so they are being paid to protect an serve us AND our family an friends!
        Whether it be from themselves or others it IS their job. Therefore, it IS a law.
        Do they, or do they not, stop a suicidal person? Hell, why not let them die to? How about the guy who just shot himself, but didn’t die should they leave them to die as well cause they meant it??
        What if it happens to be one of HIS/THEIR family members, do they also say bye-bye?!

    • Jennifer Cummings

      Yea and how funny would it be if one of his tyrant cops OD while arresting a junkie? It happened just the other week. It would be funny if the cop died due to his decision not to carry narcam.

  • IceTrey

    The SC has already ruled that the police have no duty to protect you. Do not depend on the police for help.

    • Russell Mohr

      SORRY MAN,I DIDNT SEE THAT YOU POSTED THIS . I JUST POSTED ESSENTIALLY THE SAME THING…..AT LEAST SEEING YOUR POST CONFIRMED WHAT I THOUGHT I READ HERE A FEW MONTHS AGO….YOU’D THINK THEY WOULD KNOW THIS ….ESPECIALLY IF JOE AVERAGE HERE KNOWS IT!!!…LOL

  • G’ma G

    The trouble I see here is expecting the police to make a medical diagnosis. That said, I don’t believe for a second the Sheriff is on the right side of this issue.

    • Amor Terra

      It would be no problem. If you give Naloxone to someone who’s not used opioids, even if they’ve used something else, it is said to be harmless. So the only real risk is a wasted kit.

  • Russell Mohr

    i THINK IT’S INTERESTING THAT THIS PAGE WOULD POSE THE QUESTION…’Does the state have a legal responsibility to save your life with Narcan if you overdose on opioids?”….IF I’M NOT MISTAKEN I READ HERE A FEW MONTHS BACK,MUCH TO MY DISBELIEF, THAT THE SUPREME COURT RULED THE THE POLICE ARE UNDER NO OBLIGATION TO HELP ANYONE….PERIOD….END OF STORY….SO WHAT GIVES???…..HOW COULD YOU FORGET POSTING SUCH AN IMPORTANT RULING…… ESPECIALLY WHEN YOU ANSWERED YOUR OWN QUESTION BY SAYING ….”YES THEY WOULD PROBABLY HAVE TO ADMINISTER THE DRUG”……HOW MANY TIMES HAVE WE SEEN THE POLICE SHOOT SOMEBODY OR BE AT THE SCENE OF A SHOOTING AND JUST STAND THERE AND DO NOTHING???….TOO MANY TO COUNT…THATS HOW MANY….SO WHY WOULD THIS BE ANY DIFFERENT ……CONFUSED IN COUNCIL BLUFFS

    • daniel_edmondson

      now they are about controlling the public at any cost.

  • daniel_edmondson

    Just another example of the the true mission of the American Corporate police force to control not protect the public. Their mission now is to prepare for the coming Second American Revolution when they will turned on the American Public!

    • James Bird

      Corporate police? Lol Can’t fix stupid.. Dumbest thing I’ve ever heard…

      • Amor Terra

        Really? How about this: if you take a check from someone you sell your lawnmower to, it bounces, and you call the cops, they just about bust a gut laughing at you before telling you “it’s a civil matter,” and telling you to go to court. If you write a hot check to Walmart, they bust their ass over to arrest you.

      • We are Anonymiss

        They are Corporate Police. And YOU are a copsucker!

      • lawmanjed

        Do you not understand that most cities and towns, and indeed states are incorporated, and that police departments are hired agencies of these corporations? The 2nd Amendment of the Constitution says, “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a Free state…”. That is what our founders prescribed in order to uphold security and just law enforcement in America, not British system of “constables on patrol”, aka “cops”.
        You must do research into the depths of the 14th Amendment, and the Act of 1871, which was the creation of a proxy corporation named ‘THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Inc.’, after the dissolution of the organic united states of America during the War Between the States. The corporation’s physical holdings, at the time of creation included Washington DC, and all the assets of the federal government of the organic united states of America, including of course, the army, navy, marine corps., all military bases, treasury dept., etc., etc. This proxy corporation has gone on acting as the organic government of the USA. It gets away legally by claiming US citizens are “subjects” of the Federal government, as is the wording of the 14th Amendment, in other words — franchisees of the corporation. The 1868 amendment that supposedly guarantees the ending of slavery will actually end up enslaving most of America to this private corporation created in 1871.
        Naturally and organically you are a citizen of your state. You become a US citizen by pledging yourself as one, by registering to vote, paying IRS taxes, accepting welfare, or seeking political asylum, being born within Washington DC, Puerto Rico, Guam or other US holding or territory, or if you are employed by the Federal government, US military, or if you operate as a Federally registered corporation.
        You see, there is Common Law, and another body of law called Commercial Law, or Admiralty Law. The original ‘Constitution for the united States of America’ was a Common Law document. Today’s ‘CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA’ is a corporate, Commercial Law document. The courts operate under this premise, though they will rarely admit it, heck most judges don’t even know this. When they make you pay for a license to “drive” your “motor vehicle”, it is under Commercial Law, they make you do this. Their jurisdiction is over you as a franchisee of the corporate UNITED STATES INC., which you consented to by accepting the DMV’s jurisdiction over you, when you complied. Otherwise you have a natural constitutional right to free travel along the public highways. Where they trip you up is the legalisms of legal terminology. To “drive” a “motor vehicle” by definition according to Black’s Law dictionary is to “operate in commerce”. That means unless you are operating commercially, if you are simply traveling from point A to point B, the incorporated state has no right to force you to pay for something you have the basic right to do. They cannot license a basic right. So you aren’t “driving” a “motor vehicle” you are “operating” an “automobile”, and legally you are within your rights to do so without paying the government for a license to do so, and there are dozens to hundreds of well informed Americans state nationals who get away with this legally, and lawfully.

  • Darrell W. Peters

    I was reading in a local paper that an individual had overdosed and revived with Narcan 15 times. at $75 a dose that is $1125 for one individual. After the 15th time the individual entered into a Rehab program. I understand the frustration of cities and budgets I also under stand the argument of 14 doses used on her could have been used on others. Where do yo draw the line when a life is involved?

    • Amor Terra

      Well, let’s see…just about every time I go to the store, I see morbidly obese people riding the mobility carts around the aisles loading up on sugary crap, frozen pizzas, or sodas. When they have a heart attack, or need insulin, should we just tell them too bad? How about we draw the line at acting like a fucking human being?

  • Ran-rex

    Is anyone surprised that wilfred brimley doesnt; care about durg addicts

    • We are Anonymiss

      Who is Wilfred Brimley?

      • Ran-rex

        exactly

  • crazytrain2

    I am very much against this policy, however, law enforcement officers are not generally the ones that are responsible for administering narcan. The fire department usually handles that responsibility, so this goof is not likely going to cause any deaths for refusing to carry Narcan. His refusal to carry the drug because it enables chronic users is one thing, but has he considered that officers may come across a child, or even one of the officers being exposed to fentanyl in the course if their duties? It has happened several times in the last few weeks, where an officer comes into contact with this shit that can be absorbed through the skin. An officer in Washington, Pa-not far from me, was searching a car for insurance info while investigating a traffic crash when a powder inside the car puffed up in his face. He almost died and had to have multiple doses of narcan. Another officer in Ohio got the powder on his uniform and wiped it off and just dropped. Cops do not have the tolerance that the heroin users have, so the tiniest bit of fentanyl can be deadly. Just back in December, I was testing a substance that killed one of my best friend’s brother. I was careful, but when securing it in ziplock bags, letting the air out sent a puff of the substance in the air and I almost inhaled it. I sat by the phone for almost an hour making sure that I was not exposed. So for those reasons alone, cops should carry narcan.

    With that said, I lobbied my chief to allow us to carry narcan, and he fought me on the issue for two years. I had a free supplier of narcan, and the training that would come with it. Luckily, my chief finally abated his anti-narcan beliefs and now we carry it. We have revamped our testing procedures, requiring two officers to test in a designated area, where narcan is readily available.

    I was on scene for three overdoses yesterday, and we have had about fifteen overdoses in the last week. Some of those od’s were the same people, in fact of the three that I responded to yesterday, two were the same person. He ovserdosed and was treated, then an hour later, he was unconscious in another part of town and had to be saved again. I get the frustration of this sheriff, I really do. Every time we respond to these calls, we are dealing with needles and if there is any leftover, the very substance that made professional addicts od, so you know you have some deadly shit. It can easily get on your clothes, or when checking pockets or helping these people to their feet, you can get the powder on your hands or uniform. This shit is scary. And if you have ever witnessed someone get narcan, sometimes they become violent when coming out of their fucked up state, and often, they throw up due to the respirator air bags and narcan, and they are lying on their backs, and throw up straight into the air-like three feet a la the exorcist. It’s pretty gross.

    Now here is where I bitch about the article-just a bit. But when discussing the war on drugs, and the freedom to put whatever the hell you want into your body in an article about a sheriff that is refusing to carry narcan. So, with that freedom to put whatever the hell you want into your own body comes with the consequences of that, which in this case, can be death. I disagree with this sheriff for all of the reasons that I mentioned, plus I am against refusing to aid someone and watch them die, regardless of the crappy choices they make. I get frustrated like every law enforcement officer, dealing with the same people, saving the same people on a regular basis, and when you ask where they got the drugs-because they are selling a bad batch, they play stupid, and they try and play me stupid by saying “I didn’t do no drugs” or tell you they didn’t know the guy, “just some guy” when you ask who sold them the bad drugs. But i try not to get too upset about it, because eventually, they will not be found in time and they will just be another statistic, another casualty of the war on drugs

    • Amor Terra

      That is a reasonable reaction to the article. I agree that it won’t happen often that the police are so far ahead of paramedics that they will administer Narcan before rescue gets there. All the more reason it’s not a problem for cops to carry it. You’re right that it could save a cop who gets dosed accidentally. All the more reason for them to carry it. And you’re right that it is likely to be used on chronically troubled people who make bad choices. Aren’t those USUALLY the people cops are paid to deal with? I’m sure it’s frustrating. It was frustrating as a lawyer to deal with people who did stupid shit and then lied about it (both clients and other lawyers).But that’s the job. If one doesn’t like it–quit. And when or if we stopped jailing people for using (not distributing) drugs, and put the time and effort we spend on that pissing-in-the-ocean exercise into getting them some psychological and physical help to overcome their problem, you’ll see much less of the problem.

      • crazytrain2

        Pissing in the ocean-I like that.

        I have personally walked people into treatment, and what I have found is that the treatment options don’t seem to be the type that would help. They need in-patient treatment, rather than a Rx for subutex/suboxone, which they sell to get money for heroin, or they melt the strips in water and shoot that up.

        • Amor Terra

          Yes, as a recovering addict (23 yrs), I can assure you that a prescription for anything isn’t going to change a damn thing for anyone. Changing your MIND is what fixes addiction. Therapy or 12-step, or secular sobriety–lots of talk and support is what helps those who want help. And I’m the first to admit that many do not, and it will be unsuccessful a majority of the time. However, a LOT of addicts are actually very intelligent, good people–often they’re the ones who feel the dysfunction of society most acutely and try to medicate the pain. I personally knew a man who went, quite literally, from a Narcotics Anonymous meeting to the airport to go be in a NASA think tank. He was 3 years clean from cocaine and prescription opioids. I myself was intoxicated nearly continuously for 15 years, while I graduated high school as valedictorian at 16, finished college at 19 magna cum laude, completed law school, and worked as an attorney for one of the most fancy pants law firms in my city, then opened my own practice. We’re not all stupid, nor the dregs of society. It really isn’t up to some doofus lawman without a conscience or compassion to decide whose life is worthwhile.

          I appreciate that you take a reasonable approach to the situation. Cops who don’t fancy themselves combos of Dirty Harry, Rambo, judge, jury, and executioner are increasingly hard to find these days. Good on ya.

          • crazytrain2

            Good job with the 23 years. And I know that not all addicts are bad people, probably the majority are decent people with a serious problem. But the ones that steal, rob, and so criminal actions are the ones that I deal with.

          • Amor Terra

            Or o.d.

  • captainsgirl

    I live in Butler County Ohio and I love our sheriff, but he’s wrong on this. He’s suppose to be a public servant. If he doesn’t do everything he can each time to save lives, then he’s in the wrong business.
    There is no way that Sheriff Jones can be a born again Christian. And I thought he was. A lot of conservatives aren’t born again and they’re going to find out here very soon in the Great Tribulation just how little they knew Jesus Christ. When you’re cold hearted and don’t care about every life, there is no way you have God living inside of you.
    I hope our sheriff changes his mind because there are a lot of people overdosing here in our county. It’s sad what’s going on. I blame the preachers, if they don’t rebuke him for this.

  • Jacob

    I’m from Butler County and fully support this. It’s very rare that an overdose is a kid getting into medicine. We’ve become one of the biggest heroin capitals in the states, and I think I speak for most locals when I say we’re tired of the junkies getting saved on our dime time and time again. Also, please spare me the addiction is a disease argument. It is technically a disease but one they chose to contra

    • We are Anonymiss

      Scumbag copsucker! So does cop dick taste good to you?

    • Amor Terra

      So is type 2 diabetes and most heart disease. And most of the country has one or the other of those.

    • lawmanjed

      You obviously don’t understand anything about opiate addiction. It makes nicotine addiction look like a coffee habit. It is hardcore physically addictive, the addict will go through severely painful life-threatening withdrawals if they do not get a dose at least every 24 hours. The vast majority of opiate addicts get addicted to prescription pain medications. Because opiates are so highly addictive, and physical addiction can result after only a few doses, unlike other drugs, many eventually go to heroin because it is more powerful and cheaper, not to mention more easily accessible on the street after doctors cut off a patient’s pain meds. Also, ruthless drug dealers are lacing the heroin with substances such as fentanyl, a synthetic opiate that is extremely potent and deadly. That’s why there are so many ODs. Your comment just smacks of ignorance and apathy. If you don’t care enough about these people, your neighbors, your fellow Americans, to offer a viable solution, then please keep your myopic opinion to yourself unless you insist on letting us all know that you are selfish and intellectually lazy at best. The solution to the opiate epidemic is to legalize some low-dose form of opiate for over-the-counter use, and more importantly legalize over-the-counter purchases of *Suboxone*, a ‘mixed partial agonist opioid receptor modulator’. In other words, it stops the dreaded withdrawal symptoms in the opiate user, without getting the user high, and allows them to live a normal life while weening off of the Suboxone. It can be used in-patient or out-patient, and has been widely successful. All the war-on-drugs does is keep gangs, cartels, and criminally-minded dealers in power while keeping the growing number of addicts dependent on them. And I’m not even going to take you down the rabbit hole of the Afghan heroin coming via our military, the same scam they ran in Vietnam.

  • Chas Richardson

    Find a needle exchange program even if you have to drive 4 or five hours. They should have the ability to give Narcan to anyone willing to spend an hour learning how save a life. Shooting dope ain’t easy, contrary to some opinions. And fuck this peace officer. I guess “protect and serve” only when convenient.

  • CVASN

    I wonder what the reaction of the populace would be if the local EMS Chief said that his ambulance drivers would no longer pull people from wrecks if they though that they were at fault?

  • Deborah

    So is it only opiod users that he thinks should die or does booze, cocaine, be& other prescription overdoses also get you the death card? How about folks getting wasted at the bars who OD on booze & they need to get their stomach pumped? Do we let the drunks die too? What about all the HS & college weekend warriors that are accidentally ODing on drugs & alcohol… Do they get to die too?
    This guy is an obvious genius that understands addiction, alcohol & drug abuse, & excessive behaviors.

    • We are Anonymiss

      The answer to all your questions is the same. “YES!”

  • Bob Mitchell

    Overdose doesn’t even reach top 10 for causes of death. What the hell are you talking about? Why should I trust any of your articles. This is just more generated hysteria. Really Fake News!

    • We are Anonymiss

      Whatever you say President Rumpelstiltskin!

  • George Deblasio

    I bet they had no problem taking the funds it takes to have there officers take the class to administer the narcan…one cannot just give narcan u have to be certified

  • lauraroberts

    Cops are not paramedics or doctors. How do you know if it is an “accidental” unintentional overdose or some other medical condition.

    • We are Anonymiss

      If they give it, and there is no overdose, it is harmless. Unless the person is allergic to narcan, however, there is a very small chance of that.

    • lawmanjed

      OD’s should be treated as medical issues by medical professionals long before it is a law enforcement issue to be treated by police officers.

  • We are Anonymiss

    Oh my God! Cops see their own shadow and start shooting!

  • lawmanjed

    I am definitely opposed to the war-on-drugs but these scum bags lacing the heroin they sell to kids with fentanyl are killing them. That is all the more reason this Sheriff’s department needs to do the right thing to protect the community and carry the narcan. But these evil criminals put the fentanyl in the heroin with the purpose of customers overdosing and likely dieing, so that other addicts will think it’s “good stuff”. Whether you support the war-on-drugs or not, whether you think there should be state regulated programs or let the free market do what it does, people who do that are criminals with murderous intentions and need to face justice. I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some top-secret gov’t program to attempt to eliminate the opiate addiction epidemic by killing the addicts with laced drugs. In fact there have been conspiracy theories about the CIA, along with other agencies doing precisely that for decades. Watch the movie (or read the book) called ‘The Naked Lunch’.

  • Mariann

    The sheriff is an ass. If he and his deputies really did their job they’d get the poison off the street. To allow a person to DIE when the antidote is available and you and your department refuse to use it YOU should be brought up on murder charges. I wonder how fast you’d pull out the Narcan if it was your child or grandchild???? Most of those overdosing are young kids who knew they shouldn’t “try it” but they did and then they couldn’t stop and by the time the family figured it out the teen was an addict in need of serious help which is difficult to get in many cases. End result overdose, life support, family distraught and torn apart, withdraw support.
    Get off your self righteous horse sheriff Do your job and get the crap off the street and carry Narcan!! $75.00 Your a disgrace to that badge you wear. POS

  • Wendy Colby

    This butt wipe needs to be retired before he causes anyone to die. He should be charged an accessory to murder.

  • moodswing916

    Reading through the first few dozen comments and not one mentions the addict’s children. No one really seems to care about them at all and they are suffering abuse and neglect that is out of control.

  • Julia Harbeck

    I am pretty sure this piece is not the whole story so will hold my opinion based on so little facts.

  • Uppakamp Guiding-Light

    Opiod users are proving that opiods have a dilusionary effect if their failsafe mechanism is police assistance.