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Isolated Incidents? 40 Cops in 30 Days Racked Up Dozens of Charges of Child Rape and Sexual Abuse

America’s police departments have a dirty little secret. However, this sick and twisted pattern of abuse is becoming quite the large pile of dirt to keep sweeping under the rug.

Sexual misconduct is the second highest of all complaints nationwide against police officers, representing 9.3 percent in 2010, according to a study by the Cato Institute’s National Police Misconduct Reporting Project.

In 2010, 354 of the 618 complaints involved nonconsensual sexual acts, and over half of those involved where minors.

Last month we reported on an officer in charge of a rape case who is accused of stalking and sexually harassing the victim.

In September, Oklahoma made headlines with three serial rapists, in 3 weeks, all officers, as well as one police chief molesting children.

Also, last month an ‘Officer of the Month’ brutally raped a young woman on the hood of his car, at gunpoint. 

In July, a former New York Police Department officer convicted of planning to kidnap and rape women before killing and eating them was set to go free after a federal judge overturned his conviction.

Or how about the police officer that was found guilty of raping a girl with a pencil; she was 5!

There is also the problematic issue of spousal abuse. Law Enforcement officers beat their significant other at nearly double the national average. Several studies, according to Diane Wetendorf, author of Police Domestic Violence: Handbook for Victims, indicate that women suffer domestic abuse in at least 40 percent of police officer families. For American women overall, the figure is 25 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There are literally so many cases of sexual and physical abuse allegations that we cannot possibly cover them all. However, an unofficial report put out by the website, The OP-NAT EYE, highlights 40 cops who have been convicted or charged with spousal abuse, child rape, or other types of sex crimes just in the past thirty days.

As The Op-NAT EYE points out, NFL players Adrian Peterson and Ray Rice have been crucified ad nauseum by state-run media, allegedly because domestic violence and child abuse are big issues that need to be addressed in this country. It’s now clear said media outlets only wish to improve ratings by tearing down professional athletes, and not address any real issues.

Below is the list, compiled by The Op-NAT EYE of these 40 cops.

Michael GrennierJames SheddCharles LockeErnest MartinezTom FallisDouglas BurkhalterJason MillerChristopher WarrenRuben CarerraDavid AbbottDavid HubbardKenneth SkoganThomas SilviaCorey DanielDaniel BarberFernando HernandezJason EubanksChuck BullockBradley SchnickelAndrel MartinezKramer AokiPaul McAllisterEric LundAndrew DemersKyle GarstkaDaniel HoltzclawJohn Augustus RoseSteven VigoritoBrian LeeTyler FoxSteve MaiorinoBrian BurgessGregory PyleMichael CollumTyler JochmanWilliam ByromAnthony SantosJoe WardenMata

 

UPDATE: After seeing the negative comments about the term “house negro” in the post about Charles Locke, who was just sentenced to 20 years for filming sex with teens, we felt a response was in order. First off, this list was compiled by operation nation, who is not affiliated in any way with the Free Thought Project. That being said, their reference to Locke as a “house negro” was a historical one. As minorities are frequently treated like slaves by police and receive far more harassment than those with less pigmentation in their skin, it is not some skewed analogy to compare sectors of the state with slavery.

The term “house negro” comes from a speech “Message to the Grass Roots” (1963) by activist Malcolm X, wherein he explains that during slavery, there were two kinds of slaves: “house Negroes”, who worked in the master’s house, and “field Negroes”, who performed the manual labor outside. Thus the comparison of Locke, “working inside the master’s house.” This was not intended to be racist at all, simply analogous.