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Postal Worker Inadvertently Makes Instructional Video for How Police Should Deal With Dogs

An Australian postman, armed only with a DriftHD 1080P Camera and some dog treats, shows just how easy it is to traverse a neighborhood full of dogs; without shooting them.

The fact that ‘puppycide’ is even a word is a tragedy within itself.

According to an unofficial count done by an independent research group, Ozymandias Media, a dog is shot by law enforcement every 98 minutes.

Last year The Free Thought Project reported on a slew of tragic dog shootings, including one department in Buffalo, NY whose officers shot 92 dogs from Jan. 1, 2011 through Sept. 2014.

Buffalo is hardly an isolated incident either. In Southwest Florida, the News-Press discovered 111 instances of dog shootings among multiple agencies between 2009 and 2012, representing about 37 per year. According to the Chicago Tribune, Chicago Police shot approximately 90 dogs per year between 2008 and 2013.

Last year we broke the story of a SWAT team responding a dispute between two neighbors and then shooting a small dog as it ran away from them.

Some of these officers really do seem to get a thrill out of shooting animals.

In October of last year, we broke the story of the sickening video uploaded to facebook of a Cleburne Texas Police officer calling a small dog towards him and then shooting it.

Why are these cops killing so many dogs? 

Is it because their lives in are in danger of ending every 98 minutes as they come across vicious animals in the line of duty? Some people in law enforcement actually expect us to believe that.

However, a video published to youtube by an Aussie Vlogger, who happens to be a postman, shows us that interacting with dogs, even menacing ones, can be done, without killing.

Watch below as friendly Australian postman, Cody Stavros, records some of the many dogs he encounters along his route. Some of these dogs are welcoming and nice, while others are ferocious. Either way, Stavros deals with them, without shooting them.