tensing

Cincinnati — Former University of Cincinnati Campus Police Officer Ray Tensing will not be held accountable for killing motorist and father Samuel DuBose just off campus nearly two years ago, because — despite a Grand Jury indictment for manslaughter — the trial jury remained deadlocked after deliberating for a full five days.

DuBose was pulled over for a front license plate violation — one which, in many states, would not even have been a code violation.

Now, this hotly disputatious killing will join a lengthy list of similar questionable deaths at the hands of a collective American police force eager to shoot first, ask questions later — and never take responsibility for the most grievous of wrongdoings.

“The evidence shows there was no danger to Ray Tensing when he made the decision to go for his gun,” prosecutor Seth Tieger argued in a closing statement quoted by the New York Times on Monday. “Sam DuBose was trapped in that car during that stop, and he was an easy target when his car became his coffin.”

“In his first trial, jurors were evenly split: Four jurors thought Tensing was guilty of murder, four thought he was guilty of voluntary manslaughter and four thought Tensing was not guilty, according to Prosecutor Joe Deters,” local WCPO reports.

“The prosecution filed a motion to add reckless homicide — a lesser charge — to the two-count indictment.”

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Incidentally, The Free Thought Project predicted this outcome last week in the wake of the first hung jury in Tensing’s trial with an article titled, “Get Ready – Sam Dubose’s Killer Set to be Next Cop to Walk Free for Murdering a Citizen on Video.”

READ MORE:  Cops Shoot Man as He Sat on the Couch in Front of His Mother and Child

In July 2015, Officer Tensing stopped DuBose around 6:30 in the evening, as his vehicle lacked a front license plate — something required in Ohio and a smattering of other states.

Tensing, an officer with the University of Cincinnati force — which had an arrangement with the City of Cincinnati to overstep the technical bounds of the school — decided to make the stop after following the motorist for about one mile.

“Police said Officer Tensing asked repeatedly to see the man’s driver’s license, but he ‘produced a bottle of alcohol inside the car,’ instead, said University police chief Jason Goodrich in a press conference,” the Anti-Media reported at the time.

ABC News reports, “According to The Associated Press, Tensing and his defense attorney, Stewart Mathews, have argued that, at the traffic stop, DuBose stepped on the accelerator while Tensing’s arm was trapped. The defense says Tensing, who pleaded not guilty, was scared DuBose would use his car to kill him, so Tensing acted reasonably to try to stop the threat.”

Video footage from the dash camera inside a patrol car on scene disputed police accounts of the stop — showing DuBose, perhaps panicked, indeed pulling away from the stop prematurely, but not placing Tensing in danger.

In short, it appeared DuBose simply wanted to flee — not harm the officer in any way.

Prosecutors had argued video showed the officer firing into DuBose’s vehicle just one second after he began to pull away — meaning Tensing could not possibly have feared for his life.

“Tensing wasn’t in reasonable fear of his life when he made the decision to shoot DuBose,” they contended, according to the AP.

“This office has probably viewed upwards of hundreds of police shootings, and this is the first time that we’ve thought this is without question a murder,” stated Prosecutor Joe Deters in a press conference just after the killing. “It was so unnecessary for this to occur,” he said, adding that DuBose was “subdued” and Tensing had noted the license plate number, so should not have had reason to pursue, much less fire upon, the car.

DuBose’s thirteen children have been left without the man who had turned his life around immediately before Tensing ripped their loving father from their lives.

At least some members of yet another jury in yet another trial for senseless killing by police have in essence found yet another hapless cop, afraid of his own shadow, perfectly justified in stealing the life of a Black man — ultimately due to the existence of yet another meaningless, excessive law.

This is untenable. It cannot continue. This week, police barbarism — and, worse, its ignorant impunity — has been put on trial and found a perfectly acceptable state of affairs for the United States in 2017.

But this isn’t acceptable.

Policing in America will have to endure sweeping, unapologetic reform in the use of force, interactions with the public, training, traffic stops, and morality versus legality — if, that is, they don’t want to be viewed as an enemy of the people.

If not, police impunity and senseless killing will produce one consequence U.S. foreign policy is beginning to comprehend in full — blowback. And it — like the excessively violent police — won’t be pretty.

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Claire Bernish began writing as an independent, investigative journalist in 2015, with works published and republished around the world. Not one to hold back, Claire’s particular areas of interest include U.S. foreign policy, analysis of international affairs, and everything pertaining to transparency and thwarting censorship. To keep up with the latest uncensored news, follow her on Facebook or Twitter: @Subversive_Pen.
  • It’s to the point that we’re better off without cops. The crooks don’t kill us for fun, like the cops do.

    • Levi Silveira

      I think you are misinformed. Plenty of criminals out there killing citizens maybe even for fun.

  • Not pro Israel

    If America was given the opportunity to vote, there would be no more police. Every week they are killing people in the streets and I for one am sick of it. I for one I’m at the point where a lot of people are and I’m not going to say it online but you know what it is.

  • Jamie Hall

    Charge all of these at best ignorant apologists with conspiracy and send them to prison along with the criminal cops they support. Do that and the prison industrial complex will not want for slave labor for a very long time to come.

  • John C Carleton

    The reason the cops are murdering Americans, is because thats what Washington DC wants the cops to do. Thank your local senator , House of representatives member, president and supreme court.

    • Fingal Carson

      100%. Except the rich or preferred folks. If among this class of people in the suburbs or exurbs, the police try to be extra nice and call people by sir and ma’am.

      Doesn’t mean they won’t give you a couple moving violations over the years. That’s their donut-eating, caffeine-binging way of showing everyone love.

      And speaking of moving violations, f8ck speed limits. Dumbest thing on American roads. All are 5-15 MPH too low! 30 is only acceptable in tight villages and cities and it shouldn’t apply to empty or wide roads.

      • John C Carleton

        The cops, the smart ones, pick their victims carefully. No “upstanding folks”, a couple of minor convictions on ones record opens all kind of doors to abuse from cops and court systems.

  • crazytrain2

    This was a bad shoot. The first time I saw it, I thought Tensing was caught in the seat belt, but after repeated viewings, that is not the case.

    However, the prosecution claiming “he was subdued” is false, as he was fleeing in a vehicle. And this always happens to guys that just turned their life around.

  • Steve

    Take the guns away from beat cops, like in Europe. It is apparently too easy in a rush of adrenaline to grab for your gun and shoot.

  • WiseUp2016

    Typical BS hit piece.

    First off, your headline is blatantly inflammatory. Everybody knows from the second they see the title that they’re about to read a slanted cop-hating diatribe. Fact is, Ray Tensing wasn’t “let off”; he was overcharged and saved from questionable conviction by due process. And Sam DuBose was in fact armed, with a 2,000-lb. weapon that he was attempting to use as a means of escaping responsibility for driving with no license and in possession of a significant amount of illegal drugs, and he could have recklessly used that weapon to hurt or kill Tensing or anyone else in the process.

    But enough about the title; the content of the article is equally shameful.

    “Former University of Cincinnati Campus Police Officer Ray Tensing will not be held accountable for killing motorist and father Samuel DuBose…”
    Not held accountable? He went on trial. Twice. Just because the jury couldn’t return a verdict you can agree with doesn’t mean unaccoutability. And if the prosecutors and/or the public feel that there is truly a case here, Tensing can be tried a third time. I’m not sure you know what “accountabilty” actually means; seems you think it means conviction, evidence and facts be damned.

    “DuBose was pulled over for a front license plate violation — one which, in many states, would not even have been a code violation.”
    But it IS a violation in Ohio. Hence, your assertion is meaningless. Sam was lawfully stopped. End of story.

    You quote and paraphrase the prosecution (which recklessly characterized this event as wanton murder from day one) extensively, such as here:
    “Prosecutors had argued video showed the officer firing into DuBose’s vehicle just one second after he began to pull away — meaning Tensing could not possibly have feared for his life.”
    Yes, but you conveniently omit the assertions of the defense, including their own video expert who testified that his analysis revealed that the car had moved just over three feet in just under a second when Tensing fired. Everybody says they’ve seen the tape and the car wasn’t moving when the shot was heard. An important fact that came out in this second trial was that the audio on the body cam was delayed a second or two in comparison to the video. That was a major revelation.

    And of course you include the obligatory statement describing a man with a troubled past who nonetheless was a devoted father to an unusually high number of offspring:
    “DuBose’s thirteen children have been left without the man who had turned his life around immediately before Tensing ripped their loving father from their lives.”
    Thirteen kids by eleven different women. He seemed to be closer to some of them than others, but evidently wasn’t supporting any of them. In fact, many of them met for the first time at the estate hearings. Your words are a clear mischaracterization of Sam DuBose as a “family man”.

    “…police barbarism — and, worse, its ignorant impunity — has been put on trial and found a perfectly acceptable state of affairs for the United States in 2017.”
    Who are you to question the American justice system, with its due process and presumption of innocence for every defendant, even if they wear a badge? How dare you impugn this jury, which did its job but unfortunately failed to render a verdict after days of deliberation? You call it injustice for Sam; many others are calling it justice for Ray. They say the charges against him were over the top, and the non-verdict is evidence that the system actually worked to save him from wrongful conviction.

    Now I agree that not all cops are on the level, but for you to apply terms such as “barbarism” and “ignorant impunity” to the entire law enforcement community is malicious and irresponsible on your part. You use conjecture and misrepresentation throughout this piece to malign the very people you’d call if your purse was snatched or your bicycle stolen.

    Get over it. While I don’t think Tensing was totally blameless in this case, I believe the answer to the query implied in your teaser for this story regarding responsibility for Sam Dubose’s death is very simple: Sam himself was more responsible than anyone else.

    • Stephen Geiger

      The nationwide incidence of cops over-reacting with excessive force is increasing at an alarming rate. It is part of the police state where cops view citizens as the enemy. If you look through Youtube or even follow news papers, you will see event after event where innocent citizens are murdered by cops. They are always defended by their superiors as having followed proper procedure. In almost every case they get off with no consequences.

      All I can say is if these murderers are following proper procedure, the procedures need to be changed. I could give you examples that would probably infuriate you if you at all cherish freedoms. However, I don’t feel like typing a long dissertation right now.

  • Ibcamn

    the corrupt cop ”feared for his highly trained faggot ass”,he was afraid of the mans breathe,he was afraid of the mans taste in clothing,he was afraid of the mans hand lotion…what did this faggoty ass cop fear for his life from this time…..was it that the man had on a seat belt…..or that he was black and thinking maybe to run……so the cop just murdered him in cold blood,that’s what im guessing….but you have so many ”copsuckers”out there,cops walk on these murders….people wake up…cops are criminals,terrorists with a badge,nothing more………….