swat-raids-wrong-home

Worcester, MA — Marianne Diaz and her children were asleep during the pre-dawn hours of August 18 when a gang of heavily armed militarized men kicked in the door to their apartment and began terrorizing this family.

Diaz was woken up by the sound of multiple doors being kicked in. The next thing she knew, she was naked and on her knees, looking down the barrels of several AR-15 rifles.

“Stop f**king crying and take care of your f**king kids,” she quoted one officer as saying. According to Diaz, the militarized gang would keep her in this state of terror, completely nude, for ten minutes.

With her children crying at the sight of their mother being held hostage by men in black body armor, the gang proceeded to tear apart their house.

This heavily militarized invasion of an innocent family’s home was because incompetent police had raided the wrong house.

During the assault and terrorization, dispatch records show that officers called for a female officer to come to the scene. When the female officer arrived, Diaz, who was completely naked, was then patted down by the female officer and told to spread her legs to be searched.

America can be assured, however, that this sexual abuse and destruction of a family’s home was done in the best interest of public safety, and officers claim that they acted within the confines of their authority.

The only quandary here is this; cops were looking for 36-year-old Shane B. Jackson Jr., who hadn’t lived in the home since February. Diaz had no clue who Jackson was. A simple call to the electric company would have let the police know that the utilities had been switched over to Diaz’ name, months ago.

The fact that they were at the wrong house is only part of their incompetent and brutal blunder, however. These inept barbarians actually arrested Jackson 2 weeks prior to the raid!

According to the Telegram, 

Ms. Diaz was disturbed when informed by a reporter that courthouse records show that Worcester police had arrested Mr. Jackson on a theft warrant two weeks ago.

In the police log entry for the arrest – which occurred on Southgate Street on Aug. 6 – officers list Mr. Jackson’s address as 71 Sylvan St.

That’s the same address listed for Mr. Jackson in multiple court cases open against him.

“Oh my God,” Ms. Diaz said after she learned of the arrest. “How can they say he lives in my apartment if he got arrested before they raided it?”

Diaz resides at 17 Hillside St.

According to records, police conducted absolutely no investigation, or surveillance prior to terrorizing this innocent family.

“They should have come to ask me,” Ms. Diaz said. “I would have let them in my home, if they wanted to search.”

“Before they left, one (officer) said, “We treated you with respect,’” Diaz recalled. “They didn’t even apologize.”

Case after case we see SWAT teams kick down doors to homes, shoot dogs, throw grenades at babies, and even kill innocent people because they are at the wrong house or acting on incorrect information.

“This botched gun raid, without any doubt, is about an innocent family with two children – one disabled – who were utterly terrorized and abused as a result of the grossly reckless conduct exhibited by (police),” charged Diaz’ lawyer Hector E. Pineiro. “There was virtually no due diligence and surveillance done to ensure that they got the right people.”

This gross and deadly negligence is inflicted upon the citizenry with extreme prejudice, and unapologetically. Sadly, Diaz is now part of a long list of innocent people who’ve been needlessly terrorized by the American police state.

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Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Facebook.