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Detroit, MI — It is no secret that cops shoot dogs — a lot. Frequent readers of TFTP know too well how many beloved family pets are gunned down every year by public servants in the U.S. It happens so much that there is a term for it called "puppycide." We have an endless archive of stories in which dogs meet their untimely ends at the end of a cop's gun.

According to an unofficial count done by an independent research group, Ozymandias Media, a dog is shot by law enforcement every 98 minutes. That number could be higher too as many of the cases never make the media reports.

When these cases do make the local media, oftentimes, they are dismissed by apologists who claim the dogs' owners were committing crimes or should have had better control of their dogs. Unfortunately, however, it is not just people suspected of crimes who see their dogs gunned down in front of them. Cops go onto the wrong properties all the time and kill the dogs of innocent families — and they do so with impunity.

Epitomizing the problem with cops shooting dogs is the fact that even their fellow officers are not safe. Cops attempting to kill dogs and shooting their fellow officers instead is actually a rather common phenomenon.

Earlier this month, a police officer was hospitalized after he was shot by his partner while responding to a non-criminal call about a suicidal person. The suicidal person was not a threat and the officer was not defending himself from a human when he fired his gun. Instead, when the officers walked up to the man's home, the neighbor's bulldog came toward one of them, who opened fire to kill the dog.

But he missed the dog.

"The dog charged at the officers," Detroit Police Commander Brian Harris told WXYZ. "The officers fearing for their safety, one officer fired one round at the dog. The round didn’t strike the dog, it struck his partner in the lower right calf."

The point about the dog "charging" the officers is contested, however. In the police report from the incident, a witness told investigators that the dog never once charged and was merely barking at the officers.

"We let the dog out to use the bathroom from the side door," Tiara, the niece of the dog owner told WXYZ. "The police were walking towards this door, the dog comes up, she’s protecting her area. So she just came out and she barked, she didn’t jump on them, she didn’t lunge and he was just going crazy with the gun. I thought he was gonna shoot me because he was swinging the gun all over the place. I almost had a heart attack because she’s not aggressive, she doesn’t even have teeth, she’s old."

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The officers apparently had to add a reason for shooting at the toothless dog to their official story, so they cited the dog's owner for harboring a vicious animal in the city limits of Detroit.

As for the officer who was shot, he was hospitalized but is recovering.

As this case and others like it illustrate, it is no secret that police officers are unafraid to put the lives of innocent people in danger and pull their guns out to shoot at dogs. The Free Thought Project has reported on multiple instances in which cops have attempted to shoot dogs and shot men, women, and children instead.

As we reported, and as this case illustrates, even their fellow officers aren't safe from cops attempting to kill dogs.

Officer Lane Butler was fighting for her life last year in an Indiana hospital because one of her fellow officers pulled his gun on a dog and shot her instead.

According to police, officers were responding to a complaint of criminal mischief on a Tuesday morning in January when the shooting happened. Police were at a woman's apartment to see if a person wanted on a warrant was inside. Police noted that the woman was cooperative and let officers search her home.

Before the officers entered the home, the woman warned them that her large dog was inside and in a cage. Butler and two other officers, LaFrene Butler and Aaron Wright, then entered the home and began searching it. As they searched the home, however, the dog reportedly escaped from the cage and the officers then fled the residence.

As the officers fled, Wright pulled out his pistol in a futile attempt to defend himself from the dog. Instead of shooting the dog, however, the officer shot Butler in the back as they walked out the door. Butler was wearing a bulletproof vest, but the round went in just above the protected area in her upper back.

After he negligently shot his fellow cop in the back, the department announced that Wright will face no discipline.