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Salt Lake City, UT — “Help! They’re going to kill me! Help me!” and "Don’t kill me! I don’t want to die!” were the last words Megan Joyce Mohn, 40, would utter as Salt Lake City cops piled on top of her, squeezing the air from her lungs, until she died — her death, ruled a homicide.

Despite the fact that we know how and why she died, no one has been held accountable for her death. Body camera footage was released this month, yet no one has been charged over Mohn's death which happened on Jan. 11 of this year.

According to police, on the day they held her face down and knelt on her back until she stopped breathing, Mohn had been walking around in the street holding a piece of rebar.

When officers approached her, they demanded she drop the rebar and she complied immediately. Police then told her to sit down and Mohn is seen on her knees as cops demand she give them her name and ID.

"Help! Help me!" Mohn screams as police threaten her with jail for not identifying herself.

Clearly in a delusional state, Mohn asks the officers to use their cellphones to call the police.

"We are the police," an officer answers.

"Yeah, but I wanna hear them confirm that," she says before screaming, "Help! They're gonna kill me!"

She continues to predict the officers were going to kill her and then asks for water.

“If you tell me your name, maybe,” an officer responds.

“Oh, that’s just exploitation,” the woman says in the footage.

“Well, you want water, I want your name,” the officer can be heard saying in the footage.

The conversation continues to get stranger.

“I sound like all of those stupid people on TV, don’t I?” she says to the officers.

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“You sound pretty ridiculous,” an officer responds in the footage.

At this point, the officers — instead of calling an ambulance for the obviously sick woman — begin mocking her and laughing.

“Say no to drugs, you’d have less problems,” one officer says in the footage.

“Okay first of all, alcohol is a great drug,” the woman responds.

“It is, look where you’re at,” the officer replies with a laugh.

When police begin cutting off Mohn's backpack, she becomes extremely frightened and tries to make a run for it. This would prove to be a fatal mistake as the officers used it as a reason to pile on top of her.

As the Salt Lake Tribune reports:

An officer continues to hold Mohn facedown for over four minutes as another officer bend her legs behind her in a hogtie position to restrain her from kicking. The woman occasionally yells indistinctly for about three minutes, then falls silent. After officers have her legs in shackles, one holds her leg up — which hangs limp.

The officers then move her into the “recovery position,” on her side, according to the news release, which is when the footage ends. At that point, the release states that officers attempted a “sternum rub” and administered a dose of naloxone — a medication that reverses opioid overdoses.

Officers attempted CPR, but it was too late. Mohn was then transported to a hospital where she was put on life support and died 19 days later. Enough time had passed to where the Salt Lake City police department didn't have to treat the death as an “officer-involved critical incident.”

Six months later and the medical examiner's office ruled her death a homicide. They found Mohn's immediate cause of death was "anoxic brain injury" due to "cardiac arrest" due to "probable methamphetamine intoxication in the setting of an altercation involving physical restraint."

Only then were the officers involved placed on paid administrative leave over the incident. After the officers were placed on leave, the chief of police released a statement.

"The Salt Lake City Police Department expresses its condolences to Ms. Mohn's family. Ensuring we have a comprehensive investigation into this matter is critical. This case involves many complex factors," Chief Mike Brown said in a statement, adding that he looks forward to the full officer-involved critical incident report from the district attorney's office and the department's internal investigation.

"Our officers work tirelessly every day to live up to the expectations of our community and to fulfill their duties as police officers and public servants. I know they are committed to their jobs and have a strong dedication to our community," Brown said.

That "dedication" is apparently so strong that their officers will use deadly force against a woman who posed no threat. Below is a video of police killing a woman who had harmed no one. She needed medical help and instead received 600 pounds of cops.