the atlantic

As Historical Ghislaine Maxwell Trial Unfolds, The Atlantic Publishes Article Calling Child Sex Trafficking “FAKE”

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After four victims and multiple other witnesses laid out the case against alleged child sex trafficking mogul Ghislaine Maxwell, the prosecution rested its case.

During the testimony, details of convicted pedophile Jeffery Epstein’s “little black book” began to surface which is alleged to contain hundreds of names of clients and victims. While the details of that book will likely never be made public, as the trial unfolded prominent names were dropped including Bill Clinton, Donald Trump, Prince Andrew and others.

Clinton reportedly flew on Epstein’s plane dozens of times and during the trial we learned that Epstein visited the White House while Clinton was president a whopping 17 times. Maxwell was also party to at least one of these visits.

Ghislaine Maxwell and Jeffrey Epstein visit the White House, President Clinton in 1993.

The visits to the White House happened to take place at the very time Maxwell is accused of trafficking and abusing the underage girls. Obviously, guilt by association is a fallacy and more evidence is needed to implicate Clinton in any of the abuse. However, 17 White House visits and at least 26 flights on Epstien’s “Lolita Express,” certainly does not bode well for the ex-president’s reputation — especially considering the long list of women who accused Clinton of sexual predation in the past.

The former president of the United States is a serial offender. Even during his tenure in the White House, Clinton couldn’t keep his hands to himself and was embroiled in the Monica Lewinsky scandal in which he used his authority as POTUS to engage in sexual relations with the 22-year-old intern. But that was only the beginning.

Clinton has faced charges of sexual impropriety, assault and even rape from several other women, including Paula Jones, Gennifer Flowers, Kathleen Willey and Juanita Broderick.

But perhaps the worst of this man’s history involves his relationship with Epstein as we have been learning.

On top of Epstein, however, Clinton is also good friends with other known pedophiles. As TFTP reported, photos were leaked in 2018 showing Clinton partying with a rather unscrupulous individual at an elite island resort in Punta Cana who is tied to both the Clintons, Donald Trump—and pedophilia.

The man in the photographs was a regular visitor to the White House and former associate of White House adviser and ex-presidential son-in-law Jared Kushner. His name is George Nader.

Nader was indicted in 1985 on charges of importing to the United States obscene material, including photos of nude boys “engaged in a variety of sexual acts,” according to publicly available court records.

Nader was never convicted because somehow, he had the evidence in the case — a trove of child porn found on his possession — thrown out and the court was not allowed to consider it. Then, years later this alleged pedophile surfaces behind the scenes and begins visiting the White House—frequently.

You cannot make this up. However, according to a recent piece in The Atlantic, it is all made up and “fake.”

During one of the most historical child sex trafficking cases of our time, The Atlantic runs an incredibly tone deaf piece titled, “The Great (FAKE) Child Sex-Trafficking Epidemic.”

The piece is a long-form thorough debunking of wild conspiracy theories put out by Q-Anon and the like. Filled with facts about actual snatch and grab kidnapping and missing children, the piece is essentially a red herring that goes after 4chan garbage and tinfoil nonsense — while ignoring the very real problem of American child sex trafficking.

No one here is denying that garbage theories by Q-Anon like pizzagate and the Clintons sacrificing children to consume their adrenochrome weren’t believed by a group of people and made into memes that subsequently went viral. But this piece in The Atlantic is serving the same purpose as these Q-Anon rumors. Both of them ignore the very real problem of child sex trafficking and focus on unbelievable rubbish, effectively muddying the waters between real child sex trafficking and bullsh*t.

The fact is that America does have a child sex-trafficking problem and contrary to what the extremely tone-deaf piece in The Atlantic claims, it is certainly not “FAKE.”

Not surprisingly, the piece — which ran in the middle of the Ghislaine Maxwell trial — doesn’t make a single mention of Maxwell in the thousands of words typed out by the author, Kaitlyn Tiffany. What’s more, it only mentions Epstein twice and when it does, it claims that the sex trafficking crimes — for which Epstein was tried and convicted — are only “alleged.”

Not only did this piece come out in the midst of the largest child sex trafficking trial in recent history — essentially claiming it is fake — it also came out as we learned that the CIA has been covering up child rape for years.

As TFTP reported on Sunday, through multiple FOIA lawsuits, Buzzfeed News obtained hundreds of internal CIA reports which detail the rampant abuse. According to the reports, despite multiple agents and contractors, at least 10, being caught in child sex abuse situations, just one of them has gone to jail. The others remain protected by the agency.

Is this also “fake”?

What about the multiple victims who came forward and accused Seattle Mayor Ed Murray of sexually abusing them when they were children in Washington’s foster care system?

Or, what about the fact that the Former Speaker of the House, Dennis Hastert was also arrested and served jail time for raping children?

Pennsylvania Senator Mike Folmer was also arrested after images of child pornography were found on his phone when police searched his home after obtaining a warrant. He was an outspoken advocate of child abuse reform.

In 2019, U.S. District Judge Timothy DeGiusti handed down a 15 year sentence to Ralph Shortey, a former senator from Oklahoma who was caught on camera with a child in a hotel room who he had sex with. He was also in possession of child porn

Last year, Arizona representative, David Stringer unexpectedly resigned from his elected position as a representative. After he resigned, records were released showing that he was arrested in the 80s for raping two children—one of whom had a developmental disability. After a subsequent investigation was launched, we learned about the former representative’s sick history including a recording in which he condones child sex trafficking.

The fact of the matter is that child sex abuse in this country takes place on a massive scale and many within the system are some of the worst abusers. But it is certainly not limited to them and it is certainly NOT FAKE.

Despite the overwhelming evidence to the contrary, many in the mainstream media and the government refuse to see this very real epidemic of child sex trafficking in the United States. What’s more, according to the government’s own data, the vast majority of a portion of these trafficked kids are coming from the government system who promises to keep them safe—a horrifying irony indeed. But it appears to be set up this way.

This system is set up to pull children from their families for ridiculous reasons and turn them over to for profit systems—funded by your tax dollars—that use these children as cash cows and have no incentive to keep them safe.

In 1984, the United States Congress established the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and, as part of Missing Children’s Assistance Reauthorization Act of 2013 they receive $40 million to study and track missing and trafficked children in the United States.

In 2017, NCMEC assisted law enforcement with over 27,000 cases of missing children, the majority who were considered endangered runaways.

According to their most recent report complied from FBI data and their own, of the nearly 25,000 runaways reported to NCMEC in 2017, one in seven were likely victims of child sex trafficking. Of those, 88 percent were in the care of social services when they went missing.

Showing the scope of the abuse, in 2017 alone, NCMEC’s CyberTipline, a national mechanism for the public and electronic service providers to report instances of suspected child sexual exploitation, received over 10 million reports. According to NCMEC, most of these tips were related to the following:

  • Apparent child sexual abuse images.
  • Online enticement, including “sextortion.”
  • Child sex trafficking.
  • Child sexual molestation.

Other governmental organizations have corroborated this horrifying trend. In a 2013 FBI 70-city nationwide raid, 60 percent of the victims came from foster care or group homes. In 2014, New York authorities estimated that 85 percent of sex trafficking victims were previously in the child welfare system. In 2012, Connecticut police rescued 88 children from sex trafficking; 86 were from the child welfare system. 

Equally as disturbing as the fact that most sex trafficked kids come from within the system is the fact that the FBI discovered in a 2014 nationwide raid that many foster children rescued from sex traffickers, including children as young as 11, were never reported missing by child welfare authorities.

These facts were conveniently missing from Tiffany’s piece in The Atlantic. 

As outlets like The Atlantic attempt to smear those who try to call attention to alleged and very real child trafficking, the government’s own data shows how irresponsible this is. While there are certainly some outlandish theories being presented online, the facts are outlandish enough to warrant serious scrutiny. Until this epidemic is taken seriously, the government, the media, and all those who deny it will remain complicit in keeping it going.

As Michael Dolce, who specializes in these horrific child abuse cases, pointed out, “we have set up a system to sex traffic American children.” Indeed, and as the mainstream media continues to sensationalize garbage conspiracy theories from Q-Anon, and any other fear-mongering content, they are providing perfect cover to keep that system going.

In fact, this piece in The Atlantic will only serve to fuel the dumpster fire that is Q-Anon’s version of child sex trafficking and thereby muddy the waters even more — ensuring that the abuse continues.

And now, something to ponder. Below is an image of the owner of The Atlantic, Laurene Powell Jobs — who never once mentioned Ghislaine Maxwell in their piece about child trafficking which was published during the middle of her child sex trafficking trial — allegedly with Ghislaine Maxwell.


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About Matt Agorist

Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Minds.