tint
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Los Angeles, CA —  In the land of the free, if police see you without your seatbelt on, they will claim the right to extort money from you. In the land of the free, if police feel that your window tint is too dark, they will claim the right to extort money from you. If you resist this extortion, police will claim the right to kidnap or kill you. Unfortunately, in the land of the free, these instances happen so frequently that they are often caught on video, such as the case below.

In a video posted to Youtube this week, one of Los Angeles County’s finest is seen issuing a notice of extortion, also known as a ticket, to a woman for her window tint. When the deputy asks her to sign the ticket, the woman, who says she just got off the phone with her attorney, asks if the deputy used a meter.

“He wanted me to ask if there’s a meter you used for the tint,” says the woman.

“Nope. Nope,” says the cop who is going to issue a notice of extortion based solely on his vision.

“Well, I am not going to sign the ticket,” the woman tells him.

At this point, when the officer has his authority put in check, he clearly becomes agitated and tells the woman that he will kidnap her if she refuses to sign his piece of paper.

“If you do not sign it, I will have to take you to jail, physically. It is state law.” says the deputy.

Unfortunately for the woman, California law indeed states that “If you refuse to sign the ticket the officer is required by law to take you into custody and present you before a judge for arraignment on the charges.”

Because it is law, however, does not mean it is moral. This woman had harmed no one. She put no lives at risk. She was not trespassing, stealing, raping, murdering, or in violation of anyone’s property rights, nor did she have a complaint filed against her by a citizen. By any standard — other than that of the state — this woman was entirely innocent.

This deputy, however, was claiming to be legally justified in kidnapping her, and using deadly force if necessary because her windows appeared to let less than 70% of sunlight through.

Naturally, the woman breaks down and begins crying as she feels threatened by this armed man threatening her.

Does this seem just?

It is laws like this window tint racket that need to be resisted and brought into question. No one is protected by cops stealing money from you based on how dark your windows are. This law is designed to generate revenue and allow cops to fish for other victimless crimes like possessing drugs — nothing else.

Laws like this are what give cops a bad name. It doesn’t take a hero to pull someone over and demand money for the color of their window tint — it takes a villain. If police would stop enforcing laws for victimless crimes, like window tint, seatbelts, and the drug war, this divide among the police and the policed would be repaired.

Until then, however, innocent young women, who want to protect themselves from the sun’s rays, have to worry about being extorted and kidnapped by public servants.

Below are the videos exposing the ridiculous nature of revenue collection for victimless crimes. They were posted with the following descriptions:

This is a video of my friend who got pulled over for her tint. The officer being older and seeing that there is only her in the car tries to take advantage of her by trying to scare her into getting out of the car and threatening her that she is going to be arrested for not signing tint ticket which according to him is against the law.

As you can see here the pressure he is giving her is completely uncalled for, especially for a tint ticket. Not to mention she is married to a Navy man with a navy licence plate and an american flag on the back window saying “I support our troops” It is cops like these that need to get their badge revoked for trying to do this to innocent people because they think they are above the law. And people wonder why we fear cops and do not trust them because they give us no respect, so why give them respect in return. Our Public Servants are out of control!

Luckily, according to Ryan Halstrum, who uploaded the video, once the supervisor showed up, he apologized to the woman and let her go.

Also, in case you forgot, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s department is the outfit the Free Thought Project made famous last year over a window tint violation.

Video of renowned private investigator Ken Sheppard went viral last year after Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Deputy Plunkett walked up to his window with his weapon drawn, apparently ready to kill a man — all over Sheppard’s window tint.


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Matt Agorist is an honorably discharged veteran of the USMC and former intelligence operator directly tasked by the NSA. This prior experience gives him unique insight into the world of government corruption and the American police state. Agorist has been an independent journalist for over a decade and has been featured on mainstream networks around the world. Agorist is also the Editor at Large at the Free Thought Project. Follow @MattAgorist on Twitter, Steemit, and now on Facebook.